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1/6 Plate Ambro. Pvt. Wm. H. Amminette – Botetourt Virginia Light Artillery

$3,950

1/6 Plate Ambro. Pvt. Wm. H. Amminette – Botetourt Virginia  Light Artillery – This superior ambrotype is one of only a handful of known images of members of the Botetourt Light Artillery, better known as the “Mountain Rifles”. The image shows a very youthful Amminette in an early war uniform; note on his cap are the letters “MR” for Mounted Rifles. Behind the image was a lock of Private Amminette’s hair and his obituary – he died in October of 1862 from Typhoid Fever. Private Amminette initially joined the 28th Virginia Infantry in May of 1861, and would later join, in December of 1861, the Botetourt Light Artillery or the Mounted Rifles. The image is housed in its original full case. The lock of Amminette’s hair, tied by a single strand of black thread, is now in a small box that will accompany the image, as will Amminette’s war period obituary, published in a Buchanan Co., Virginia newspaper. The obituary details, with great poignancy, Amminette’s childhood as an orphan. The image is in excellent condition with some age spotting to the emulsion; it exhibits a high degree of resolution. There is some solarization around the image, but it does not intrude into the image proper nor does it not detract from the appearance of the image. This is indeed a rare image.

William H. Amminette

Residence was not listed; an 18 year-old Clerk.  Enlisted on 5/15/1861 as a Private.  On 5/15/1861 he mustered into “H” Co. VA 28th Infantry  He was discharged for disability on 10/31/1861  (Estimated day of discharge for chronic rheumatism)  On 12/24/1861 he transferred into VA Botetourt Light Artillery  (date and method of discharge not given)

 

 

 

Botetourt Light Artillery was organized with men from Botetourt County in May, 1861, as an infantry company. It was assigned to the 28th Regiment Virginia Infantry but in December transferred to the artillery.
During April, 1865, the company disbanded. Its commanders were Captains Joseph W. Anderson, Henry C. Douthat, and John W. Johnson.

 

Botetourt VA Light Artillery Battery

Organized: on 12/24/61
Mustered Out: 4/8/65

 

From

To

Brigade

Division

Corps

Army

Comment

Dec ’61 Jan ’62 Johnson’s     Army of Northwest  
May ’62 Jul ’62 Barton’s     Dept of East Tennessee  
Jul ’62 Dec ’62 Barton’s Stevenson’s   Dept of East Tennessee  
Dec ’62 Jan ’63 Barton’s Stevenson’s   Dept of Mississippi and East Louisiana  
Jan ’63 Feb ’63 Barton’s Stevenson’s 2nd Military Dist Dept of Mississippi and East Louisiana  
Apr ’63 Apr ’63 Artillery Stevenson’s 2nd Military Dist Dept of Mississippi and East Louisiana  
Apr ’63 Jul ’63 Artillery Stevenson’s   Dept of Mississippi and East Louisiana  
Oct ’63 Feb ’64 Unattached Artillery     Dept of Western Virginia and East Tennessee  
Feb ’64 Apr ’64 Artillery     Dept of Western Virginia  
Apr ’64 May ’64 Unattached     Dept of Western Virginia  
Apr ’64 Mar ’65 Artillery     Dept of Southwest Virginia and East Tennesee  
Mar ’65 Apr ’65 King’s Artillery 1st Army of Northern Virginia  

 

 

 

28th VA Infantry

Organized: Lynchburg, VA on 5/17/61
Mustered Out: 4/9/65 at Appomattox Court House

 

From

To

Brigade

Division

Corps

Army

Comment

Jun ’61 Jul ’61 5th     Army of Potomac  
Jul ’61 Oct ’61 5th   1st Army of Potomac  
Oct ’61 Jan ’62 5th Longstreet’s 1st Dept of Northern Virginia  
Jan ’62 Mar ’62 5th Longstreet’s Potomac District Dept of Northern Virginia  
Mar ’62 Jun ’62 Pickett’s Longstreet’s   Army of Northern Virginia  
Jun ’62 Aug ’62 Pickett’s Longstreet’s 1st Army of Northern Virginia  
Aug ’62 Sep ’62 Pickett’s Kemper’s 1st Army of Northern Virginia  
Sep ’62 Sep ’62 Pickett’s D.R. Jones’ 1st Army of Northern Virginia  
Sep ’62 Feb ’63 Pickett’s/Garnett’s Pickett’s 1st Army of Northern Virginia  
Feb ’63 Apr ’63 Garnett’s Pickett’s   Dept of Virginia and North Carolina  
Apr ’63 May ’63 Garnett’s Pickett’s   Dept of Southern Virginia  
May ’63 Sep ’63 Garnett’s/Hunton’s Pickett’s 1st Army of Northern Virginia  
Sep ’63 May ’64 Hunton’s     Dept of Richmond  
Mar ’64 Apr ’64       Dept of Henrico Co. I
May ’64 Apr ’65 Hunton’s Pickett’s 1st Army of Northern Virginia  

 

 

The

Botetourt Light Artillery

Of

Virginia

CSA

1861-1865

Anderson’s/Johnston’s/Douthat’s Battery

A History Of The Company


THE BOTETOURT ARTILLERY

1861-1865

Since The Revolution, Virginia’s Constitution had required an active militia in every county. This requirement was largely ignored until John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry in October 1859 alarmed the entire State. It was clear that each community had to protect themselves.

In that same month, Mr. William Watson Boyd, a leader in Buchanan, began to organize a volunteer militia company to protect the local citizens and personal property. The company was fully organized in December of 1859. Boyd was elected captain and Joseph W. Anderson. A local lawyer was elected 1st Lieutenant. The newly formed militia adopted the name “Mountain Rifles”. Richmond was notified of the new formation and it was accepted into the Virginia militia in early 1860.

Peace, harmony and prosperity was evident throughout the Valley throughout the next year but a growing rift between North and South over State’s Rights, taxation, tariffs and slavery as the leading cause.

News came from Richmond that South Carolina had seceded from the Union in December 1860. Other states followed suit in early 1861. A secession convention was held in Richmond for several weeks with the majority of the delegates seeking compromise and negotiation. On April 12, 1861 the opening act of “The War for Southern Independence” was initiated when cadets from The Citadel bombarded Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor. The call by President Abraham Lincoln on April 15, 1861 for Virginia to furnish troops to crush the rebellion was the final straw. Governor Letcher issued orders for all State Militia units to stand ready to receive marching orders at a moments notice. The Virginia Secession Commission voted on April 17, 1861 to secede from the Union.

With the secession of the Old Dominion and the outbreak of war, The Mountain Rifles was ready to serve their state. Captain Boyd was somewhat advanced in age and not in good health so he resigned his militia post and Captain Joseph W. Anderson, the former 1st Lieutenant, was chosen as the new Captain. Other officers elected by the Company were: Philip Peters (1st Lt.), John W. Johnston (Senior 2nd Lt.), Henry C. Douthat (Junior 2nd Lt.) and William H. Norgrove (Orderly Sergeant). Immediately 2nd Lt. Johnston of the Mountain Rifles and Lt. Thomas Henry Johnson of the Blue Ridge Rifles, a neighboring militia unit from the Mill Creek area, were sent to Richmond to request arms and marching orders.

The two units pitched into camp while they waited the return of the lieutenants from Richmond. They camped the first two weeks at the Hobbs House across the river from Buchanan in Pattonsburg. They broke camp and headed to Arch Mill to set up camp while awaiting further orders. While there the ladies of Buchanan presented the Company with a Virginia flag, made from the wedding dress of Captain Anderson’s young bride.

The men of The Mountain Rifles did not have uniforms. They wore linsey shirts and big black hats tucked up on one side with a rosette of green ribbons. Family, friends and towns people furnished other articles, such as knapsacks, canteens, and even sewing kits.

In early May they received orders to report to Lynchburg. On the spring morning of May 15, 1861, The Mountain Rifles assembled in front of the Old Exchange Hotel on Main Street in Buchanan. After a short bidding of goodbyes from family and friends the command was given “Fall in men”. As they marched down Main Street a local band played “The Girls I Left Behind”. They were off to war.

They marched over the Blue Ridge to the settlement of Bufordville, now known as Montvale, in Bedford County where they met up with the Blue Ridge Rifles. At 1pm on May 15, 1861, The Mountain Rifles –now totaling 76 men and two Negro servants, William Anderson and William Mayo, boarded a train at the Bufordville Depot and steamed toward Lynchburg. The train stopped at Liberty –Bedford- to let a mail train pass and the officers gave the men permission to go into town to pick up needed items, They not only got those needed items but also picked up several bottles of local spirits which helped raise their spirits!

The arrived at Camp Davis in Lynchburg on Thursday May 16, 1861 and the following morning Col. Jubal A. Early organized three infantry regimen its, one of which became the 28th Virginia. It was here that the Mountain Rifles lost their independent identity. They were now Company “I” of the 28th.

On the 21st of June the 28th was brigaded with the 8th, 18th and 19th Virginia. These regiments formed the 5th Brigade, First Corps, and Army of the Potomac, Confederate Sates of America, commanded by Col. Philip St. George Cocke.

By June 30, 1861 –after 45 days of service- disease and illness had started to take its toll on Company I. Captain Anderson reported that only 56 of his 83 men were present and fit for duty.

On July 17, 1861 orders were received to head for Manassas Junction. On the 18th they were positioned at Balls Ford on Bull Run Creek. By mid day the roar of cannon and musket fire could be heard four miles down river near Mitchell’s Ford. It was their first sound of war as General James Longstreet and his men encountered the Union Army at Blackburn’s Ford. The following afternoon the men of the 28th and her sister regiment the 19th Virginia crossed Bull Run and took up position on the opposite bank. They remained at their post until 2pm on July 21st when the Mountain Rifles and the remainder of the 28th made their entrance into the battle of First Manassas. Company I did not suffer any casualties during the action but did manage to assist in the capture of the entire 1st Michigan Infantry Regiment and its Commander Col. Orlando B. Wilcox. They returned victorious to Fairfax Court House, established camp and remained there until the early Fall of 1861.

In August the Regiment was reformed and Company I became Company H. A newly mustered company from the Amsterdam Community in Botetourt County became Company K on August 20, 1861 under the commander of Capt. P.G. Breckenridge.

Before the end of their first year of service, the Army again reorganized and offered a 30-day furlough to those men who would reenlist for the remainder of the war and also gave them the opportunity for individuals to change their branch of service. Captain Anderson’s company was among the first to volunteer. In late December 1861 Captain Anderson obtained an order from the War Department to change from Infantry to Light Artillery.