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Ambrotype of Richard H. Harris 2nd Co. Stuart Horse VA Light Artillery Battery

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Ambrotype of Richard H. Harris 2nd Co. Stuart Horse VA Light Artillery Battery – Fine sixth plate ambrotype of a very young Private Richard Herbert Harris of the 2nd Co. Stuart Horse Light Artillery. Harris, who entered the Confederate Army in 1864, was only seventeen when he joined. Harris is depicted in this image wearing what appears to be a Type Three, Richmond Depot jacket; he is also holding a slouch hat, which appears to have a worsted wool hat cord. The image, which is housed in its original full case, is accompanied by two CDVs – one of Harris, about ten years after the war – this image has his name, in pencil, inscribed on the back of the image. The second CDV is what appears to be a wartime image of Harris’ sister. Richard Herbert Harris attended the University of Virginia, after the war, becoming a physician, in the Nottoway County Virginia area. He would only live to be about twenty-nine, dying in 1876. During Harris’ Confederate army service, his unit would participate in action, near Charlottesville, in February of 1864, as well as action during the Siege of Petersburg, Sailor’s Creek and the Appomattox Courthouse skirmishes. This image is in fine condition and depicts a very young, but earnest Confederate.

Richard Herbert Harris

Residence was not listed;

Enlisted as a Private (date unknown).

 

He also had service in:

“2nd” Co. VA 2nd Stuart Horse Light Artillery  (Postwar reference only)

2nd Co. Stuart Horse VA Light

Artillery Battery

Organized: on 8/9/62

Mustered Out: 4/9/65

 

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To

Brigade

Division

Corps

Army

Comment

Aug ’62Sep ’63Horse ArtilleryCavalry Army of Northern Virginia Sep ’63Mar ’65Horse Artillery CavalryArmy of Northern Virginia Mar ’65Mar ’65McGregor’sHorse ArtilleryCavalryArmy of Northern Virginia Mar ’65Apr ’65Thomson’sHorse ArtilleryCavalryArmy of Northern Virginia

 

The McGregor’s Battery [also known as the Stuart Horse Artillery-2nd Artillery] was organized in August, 1862, by dividing Pelham’s original company. Had 106 engaged at Gettysburg, and surrendered only 2 in April, 1865. Its commanders were Captains G. Wilmer Brown, M.W. Henry, and William M. McGregor.

Virginia: Stuart Horse Artillery Battery, 2nd Company

Field and Staff

  • Commander: Mathias Winston Henry (Captain)
  • Captain: William M. McGregor and G. Wilmer Brown

 Assignments

  • August 1862-September 1863: Horse Artillery Battalion, Cavalry Division, Army of Northern Virginia
  • September 1863-March 1865: Horse Artillery Battalion, Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia
  • March 1865: McGregor’s Battalion, Horse Artillery, Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia

March-April 1865: Thomson’s Battalion, Horse Artillery, Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia

Roster of the 1st & 2nd Stuart Horse Artillery

HARMAN. MADISON: 1st SHA. Listed in Amos D. Woods’ Floyd County: A History of Its People and Places as a member of this unit. Woods indicates that he was captured and sent to Fort Delaware at some point in the war.  Age 32, farmer, 1860 Floyd Co. Census.

HARRIS, ALEXANDER: 1st SHA. Pvt. Enl. 5/15/6?, Richmond. Captured 10/9/64, Strasburg and sent to Pt. Lookout. Exchanged 3/28/65. NFR.

HARRIS, RICHARD HERBERT: 2nd SHA. Postwar reference.

HARRISON, WILLIAM W.: 1st SHA. Pvt. Enl. ? Captured 10/9/64, Strasburg; sent to Pt. Lookout. Exchanged 1/17/65. Present 11/26/65). NFR.

HART. FRANK: 1st SHA. Pvt. Enl. 7/11/67, Richmond. Wounded 10/11/63. Postwar reference claims he lost his arm at Cold Harbor. 60 day furlough to Mobile, Alabama, 4/11/64. NFR.

HART, S. JAMES: 2nd SHA. Pvt. Clothing receipt only (11/12/64). NFR.

 

2nd Stuart Virginia Artillery (McGregor’s VA Battery)

   

Muster In: Organized by the division of the 1st Company on August 9, 1862.1

Muster Out: April 9, 18652

Commander(s):

Captain William M. McGregor

First Offensive Order of Battle: Breathed’s Artillery Battalion | Horse Artillery | Cavalry Corps | Army of Northern Virginia | Confederate Army3

  • Commander:
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Second Offensive Order of Battle: Breathed’s Artillery Battalion | Horse Artillery | Cavalry Corps | Army of Northern Virginia | Confederate Army4

  • Commander: Captain William M. McGregor5
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Third Offensive Order of Battle: Breathed’s Artillery Battalion | Horse Artillery | Cavalry Corps | Army of Northern Virginia | Confederate Army6

▪   Commander: Captain William M. McGregor7

▪   Unit Strength:

▪   Weapons:

Fourth Offensive Order of Battle: Breathed’s Artillery Battalion | Horse Artillery | Cavalry Corps | Army of Northern Virginia | Confederate Army8

▪   Commander:

▪   Unit Strength:

▪   Weapons:

Fifth Offensive Order of Battle: Chew’s Artillery Battalion | Horse Artillery | Cavalry Corps | Army of Northern Virginia | Confederate Army9,10

▪   Commander: Captain William M. McGregor11

▪   Unit Strength:

▪   Weapons:

▪   Note: This battery typically operated with Rooney’s Lee’s Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia.12

Sixth Offensive Order of Battle: Chew’s Artillery Battalion | Horse Artillery | Cavalry Corps | Army of Northern Virginia | Confederate Army13

▪   Commander: Captain William M. McGregor14

▪   Unit Strength:

▪   Weapons:

▪   Note: This battery typically operated with Rooney’s Lee’s Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. (need source, probably an inspection report)

Seventh Offensive Order of Battle: Chew’s Artillery Battalion | Horse Artillery | Cavalry Corps | Army of Northern Virginia | Confederate Army15,16

▪   Commander: Captain William M. McGregor (November & December 1864)17,18

▪   Unit Strength:

▪   Weapons: 4 x 3-inch Rifles (December 28, 1864)19

▪   Note: This battery typically operated with Rooney’s Lee’s Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. (need source)

Eighth Offensive Order of Battle: Chew’s Artillery Battalion | Horse Artillery | Cavalry Corps | Army of Northern Virginia | Confederate Army20,21,22

▪   Commander: None listed. (January & February 1865)23,24

▪   Unit Strength:

▪   Weapons:

▪   Note: This battery typically operated with Rooney’s Lee’s Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. (need source)

Ninth Offensive Order of Battle: McGregor’s Artillery Battalion | Horse Artillery | Cavalry Corps | Army of Northern Virginia | Confederate Army25,26

▪   Commander: None listed. (March & April 1-2, 1865)27,28

▪   Unit Strength:

▪   Weapons:

Dyer’s/Sifakis’ Compendium Info:

Siege of Petersburg Battles29:

▪   Petersburg Siege (June 1864-April 1865)

▪   Appomattox Court House (April 9, 1865)

 

CLARK NC: 1st North Carolina Cavalry at the Siege of Petersburg

   

CLARK NC: 1st North Carolina Cavalry at the Siege of Petersburg

Editor’s Note: The following excerpt comes from Walter Clark’s five volume Histories of the Several Regiments and Battalions from North Carolina in the Great War 1861-’65, published in 1901.  The reference work provides mini regimental histories written mostly by men representing each unit, with gaps filled in by editor Clark.  These histories often provide a surprising amount of detail on the Siege of Petersburg.

***

When General Grant once started to cross the James River it was no time to fight battles other than those forced upon him. The object was rather to gain position and see who could command the river crossings and best secure any heights overlooking the two beleaguered cities.

On the 7th of June the plan of his movements was fairly developed, and the Confederate cavalry was ordered to harass him accordingly. My brigade (embracing the First, Second, Third and Fifth North Carolina Cavalry) was detached and hastened to the lower fords of the Chickahominy. On the 13th we had followed the main Federal column to Wilcox’s Landing and by the 18th we too had also hastened round by Richmond and taken position two miles south of Petersburg. During these rapid movements we had had several severe skirmishes with the enemy, especially at Malvern Hill, Nantz’ Shop, Herring Creek, Crenshaw’s and The Rocks, the First Cavalry often leading.

On the 21st of June, while guarding the Petersburg & Weldon Railroad at the Davis farm, just below Petersburg, my pickets notified me of the approach of a large Yankee force of infantry, manifestly with the view of seizing and holding the railroad at that point. We were wholly without support, but the thick undergrowth and other surroundings favored a vigorous resistance in a dismounted fight. I selected a high point for my horse artillery under McGregor, and as far as possible screened it from the enemy’s view. I also kept the Fifth Cavalry (Sixty-third North Carolina Regiment) mounted, in reserve to support McGregor and otherwise act as emergency might require, I then dismounted the First, Second and Third Cavalry, and formed two heavy skirmish lines, well concealed in thick undergrowth in front of the railroad, with instructions for the first line not to fire until the Federals were in less than one hundred yards of them, and then after a single volley to slowly retire on the second line, where the real fight was to be made. At this juncture also the full battery of four guns was to open. The plan worked well and proved a complete success. The Federals were not only driven back, but in the panic that followed the Third Cavalry, led by Colonel John A. Baker and my Aid, Lieutenant F. C. Foard, rushed upon the Federal ranks and captured many prisoners; but in the confusion which ensued both Baker and Foard were also in turn captured. The Yankee force in front of us turned out to be Barlow’s Division of infantry, four thousand strong, and were driven back with a loss of forty dead on the field and twenty prisoners, including a Lieutenant-Colonel and two Captains taken. My own loss was twenty-seven killed, wounded and missing.