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Confederate Ironclad CSS Jackson Rope Tiedown Found in the Chattahoochie River

$375

Confederate Ironclad CSS Jackson Rope Tiedown Found in the Chattahoochie River – This rare, excavated relic was eyeballed by a relic hunter several years ago, while walking along the banks of the Chattahoochie River, in the location of the scuttling of the Confederate ironclad, the CSS Jackson, also known as the CSS Muscogee. Although initially constructed in 1862, the Jackson was not commissioned until December of 1864. Still beset with many mechanical problems, the Jackson was burned and scuttled by Union troops during the Battle of Columbus, Georgia, in April of 1865. In the 1960s, the remaining sections of the Jackson’s hull was raised and became part of the collection of the National Civil War Naval Museum in Columbus, Georgia. This tiedown is constructed of a heavy, cast iron; the device was bolted by long iron shafts drilled through the deck surface into the below deck area, thereby leaving the rope eye, which was cast into a solid bar, resting on the deck of the ship. The overall condition of the tiedown is excellent, with no flaking or ongoing deterioration; it must have rested under silt for many years, in anaerobic conditions, preventing much oxidation from corroding it. The tiedown measures as follows: Height – 16.25”; Width of top bar – 10”. This unusual relic comes with a letter of provenance written by the relic hunter who originally found it, while walking along the banks of the Chatthoochie River, at the site of the scuttling of the CSS Jackson. Apparently the river was quite low, at the time of discovery, as the relic hunter said that he saw the tiedown sticking out, above the water line. This is a unique and important artifact.

CSS Muscogee

Name: CSS Jackson Launched: December 22, 1864 General characteristics Type: Ironclad Ram Displacement: 2000 tons Length: 223.5 ft (68.1 m) Beam: 56.5 ft (17.2 m) Draft: 8 ft (2.4 m) Propulsion: Steam engine Armament: Four 7-inch Brooke Rifles; two 6.4-inch Brooke Rifles; two 12 pounder boat howitzers. Armor: 4 inches of plate iron over 20 inches of White Oak.

CSS Muscogee and Chattahoochee U.S. National Register of Historic Places

CSS Muscogee was an ironclad ram built for the Confederate States Navy during the American Civil War. She was known as Muscogee while being built and up until her launching; after that all surviving Confederate records refer to her as the “ironclad ram Jackson.” No official explanation survives as to why her name was changed. History The ironclad was built during 1862 at Columbus on the banks of the Chattahoochee River, Georgia and was finally commissioned as CSS Jackson in December 1864.The Columbus Naval Iron Works supplied all the machinery installed aboard Jackson. The ship faced multiple setbacks and delays that ultimately prevented her from entering C.S. Naval service and engaging elements of the larger Union blockade of the Confederacy. On 16 April 1865, while still needing fitting out, Jackson was set ablaze, then scuttled by the Union’s Wilson’s Raiders during the Battle of Columbus, Georgia. This engagement is widely regarded as the “Last Battle of the Civil War.” (On April 20, Wilson’s men captured Macon, Georgia without resistance, and Wilson’s Raid came to an end. This was only six days prior to General Joseph E. Johnston’s surrender of all Confederate troops in the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida to William Tecumseh Sherman in North Carolina.) CSS Jackson’s remains were raised a century later, during the early 1960s, from that portion of the river inside the boundaries of Fort Benning; her surviving below-the-waterline hull was then placed on exhibit at the National Civil War Naval Museum in Columbus. A thick metal white frame outline, indicating the various dimensions of Jackson’s original fore and aft deck arrangements and armored casemate, is now erected directly above the hull’s wooden remains to simulate for visitors the ironclad’s original size and shapes. CSS Jackson was a large, ironclad ram built for the Confederate States Navy during the American Civil War. The ‘Jackson’ was officially known as the ‘Muscogee’ until she was launched but all existing, Confederate records refer to the ship as the ‘Ironclad Ram Jackson’. She was built at Columbus on the banks of the Chattahoochee River, Georgia in 1862 and commissioned and launched in December 1864. The Columbus Naval Iron Works supplied most of the machinery used on the Jackson. The ship faced several setbacks mainly the acquisition of suitable iron-plate (See impression of iron plate cladding of the type used) which prevented her from entering service and engaging the Union blockade. After river trials, in early April 1865 ‘Jackson’ returned to Columbus to complete fitting-out. She was still berthed there and incomplete when later that month, following the Battle of Columbus, she was set ablaze and scuttled on April 16 by Wilson’s Raiders. Her remains were later discovered and raised during the 1960s from the portion of the river inside the boundaries of Fort Benning. Today the remains of the ‘CSS Jackson’ are exhibited at the National Civil War Naval Museum in Columbus. CSS Muscogee (1864-1865). Also known as CSS Jackson CSS Muscogee , an ironclad ram screw steamer, was built at Columbus, Georgia, beginning in late 1862. She was launched in December 1864, but was not completed. In April 1865, Muscogee (or Jackson , as she was also called) was burned on the Chattahoochee River by Union Army forces. Her remains were recovered during the 1960s and placed on exhibit at Columbus.

CSS Muscogee (1864-1865) - Also known as CSS Jackson

CSS Muscogee , an ironclad ram screw steamer, was built at Columbus, Georgia, beginning in late 1862. She was launched in December 1864, but was not completed. In April 1865, Muscogee (or Jackson , as she was also called) was burned on the Chattahoochee River by Union Army forces. Her remains were recovered during the 1960s and placed on exhibit at Columbus.