IMG_7572
IMG_7572IMG_7573IMG_7571

Extremely Rare Identified CS Detective’s Badge

http://web3.encyclopediavirginia.org/resourcespace/filestore/5/5/8_4911329efab3f5f/558scr_544bfd24fc0b0d7.jpg

Extremely Rare Identified CS Detective’s Badge – One of only two others known to exist, this exquisite, coin silver badge remains in wonderful, non-dug condition. The badge, passed down through the family of William Shepard Miller, originally from the Gloucester area in southeastern, Virginia, and an enlistee in the 34th Va. Infantry, at the onset of the Civil War, came to us, directly from a descendant of Wm. S. Miller. The badge had been housed in an old frame, with an accompanying label that stated the it had been owned and worn by Wm. S. Miller. The badge, which measures, approximately 2” x 1.5”, retains a fine, mellowed patina; it also still has its original, mid-19th century T-pin, on the back of the badge. A comparable badge was excavated by long-time Richmond area, relic hunter, Jim Livesay, in 1995. One of only one other known, at the time, this excavated detective’s badge was discovered by Mr. Livesay, near Richmond, Virginia, while searching a recently bulldozed area, which had previously produced a variety of Civil War relics.

 William S. Miller

Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 2/18/1863 at Petersburg, VA as a Private.  
On 2/18/1863 he mustered into "Batty B" Co. VA Co B 12th Light Artillery  (date and method of 
discharge not given)  He was listed as: * Hospitalized 12/23/1863 Petersburg, VA (With rubiola) 
* Returned 1/2/1864 (place not stated) * Issued clothing 10/30/1864 (place not stated) 
 

William S. Miller

Residence was not listed; Enlisted as a Private (date unknown).     He also had service in: "
A" Co. VA 34th Infantry 

 

The 34th Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment was an infantry regiment raised in Virginia for service in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. It fought mostly with the Army of Northern Virginia.

The 34th Virginia was organized in May 1864,with men from Norfolk, Richmond, and Yorktown, and the counties of Gloucester, Mecklenburg, Bedford, Greene, and King and Queen. For almost two years the unit served as heavy artillery attached to the Department of Richmond and was known as the 4th Heavy Artillery.

In May, 1864, it was assigned to Wise’s Brigade as infantry. It participated in the long Petersburg siege south of the James River, and saw action in various conflicts around Appomattox.

It contained 466 effectives in June, 1862, and surrendered 14 officers and 210 men.

The field officers were Colonel John T. Goode, Lieutenant Colonel Randolph Harrison, and Major John R. Bagby.

Virginia’s Martin Battery – Co. B 12th Va. Light Artillery

Brief History

  • Organized in April 1862, with men from North Carolina and Virginia.
  • For a time it was attached to the 12th Battalion Virginia Artillery.
  • Later the men from North Carolina were transferred to the 13th North Carolina Artillery Battalion.
  • This company served at Suffolk, then was assigned to F. G. Boggs’, B. F. Eshleman’s, and N. A. Sturdivant’s Battalion of Artillery.
  • Much of the time it was attached to the Department of Richmond and on duty south of the James River.
  • The unit had 1 man wounded at Kelly’s Store and in February 1864, totaled 48 effectives.
  • In March 1865, it was converted to heavy artillery and manned the guns on the outer line below Richmond.
  • Captain S. Taylor Martin was in command.

Very little is known about this badge and the Confederate detectives, in general. The assumption is that this little known Confederate military entity was attached to the Confederate Provost Guards. Some references to this unit have been found as follows:

Rebel Watchdog: The Confederate States Army Provost Guard Paperback – March, 1997, by Kenneth Radley (Author)

- Excerpt from: The Confederate Records of the State of Georgia, Volume 2: “Citizens who belong neither to the land nor naval of the Government or to the militia in actual service are arrested by provost guards and Government detectives under charges of treason or other indictable offenses …”

- George W. Alexander and Castle Thunder: A Confederate Prison and Its Commandant (book about the infamous Provost and Commandant of Castle Thunder; includes mention of his uniform and wearing a badge)

This is a very rare opportunity to own piece of one of the least recorded aspects of Confederate military history, identified to a member of the 34th Va. Infantry and 12th Va. Light Artillery. SOLD

 

 

Category: .