Civil War McDowell Officer’s Forage Cap Id’d to Gen. John J. Peck
Civil War McDowell Officer’s Forage Cap Id’d to Gen. John J. PeckIMG_6239IMG_6242IMG_6243IMG_6244IMG_6245IMG_6247IMG_6248IMG_6249IMG_6250IMG_6279 (1)IMG_6280Screen Shot 2019-12-16 at 2.59.11 PMScreen Shot 2019-12-16 at 2.59.34 PM

Fine Civil War McDowell Officer’s Forage Cap Id’d to Gen. John J. Peck

$7,500

Fine Civil War McDowell Officer’s Forage Cap Id’d to Gen. John J. Peck – This superior example of a Civil War officer’s, high quality McDowell forage cap was worn during the war by General John James Peck. Peck, born in 1821, was a graduate of West Point, graduating in 1843, along with Ulysses S. Grant, as well as several other soon to become famed officers. Peck served, with distinction, in the Mexican War; he was brevetted to the rank of Captain for gallantry and meritorious conduct exhibited at the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco and later brevetted to the rank of Major for his actions at the Battle of Molino del Rey. Peck would later serve, out west, assisting in quelling attacks by Apache Indians. He resigned from the Army, in 1853. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Peck accepted a commission as a Brigadier General, commanding volunteers. He was actively engaged during the Peninsula Campaign and promoted to the rank of Major General for his actions at the Battle of Malvern Hill. In September of 1863, Peck took command of all of the Union troops, in Virginia, south of the James River. Following actions surrounding the small city of Suffolk, Virginia, Peck was transferred south, to take command of the District of North Carolina. After the war, Peck resigned from the army, moved to Syracuse, New York where he became the president of the New York State Life Insurance Company. Peck died, at his Syracuse home, in 1878.

This finely crafted, McDowell style, officer’s forage cap, remains in superior condition. It is constructed of a fine, deep blue, English broadcloth wool. The chinstrap, constructed of a patent leather, is affixed to the cap by two U.S. staff officer, cuff buttons. The typically diminutive, contoured brim, also of a fine, patent type leather, is bound with a black painted canvas strip. Affixed to the front of the cap is a U.S. staff officer’s, bullion wreath insignia, hand sewn to the cap.  The cap’s interior is in equally superior condition; the black silk, quilted lining is complete and attached to the interior crown by a diamond pattern stitching. The sweat band, in excellent condition and complete, as well, is constructed of a wide brown, thin leather, hand sewn to the cap’s interior. Behind the sweat band can be seen buckram stiffener, often found in Civil War caps. When the sweat band is raised, clearly hand inked beneath one side, near the front of the cap, is the name: “J J Peck”. This is indeed a very fine example of a superbly crafted forage cap, worn during the Civil War by a significant and meritorious Union General.

Accompanying General Peck’s cap is a full view image / CDV of the general, in uniform; he autographed the back of the CDV, signing: “Major General Peck / Maj. Gen. Peck / Syracuse.”

John James Peck (1821 – 1878)

Born: 01/04/1821 in Manlius, NY
Died: 04/21/1878 in Syracuse, NY
USMA: 1843, class rank: 08/39

Promotions

Date

To Rank

Full/Brevet

Army/Vol

Comments

 08/09/61

Brig-Gen

Full

Vol

 07/04/62

Major-Gen

Full

Vol

Commands

From

To

Brigade

Division

Corps

Army

 10/03/61  03/13/62

3

Buell’s

Army of Potomac

 03/13/62  06/23/62

3

1

4

Army of Potomac

 06/24/62  09/26/62

2

4

Army of Potomac

 08/14/63  01/04/64

Dist of North Carolina

18

Department of Virginia and North Carolina

 02/05/64  04/28/64

Dist of North Carolina

18

Department of Virginia and North Carolina

JOHN JAMES PECK

     Peck, John J., major-general, was born in Manlius, N. Y.,  Jan. 4, 1821, and was graduated at the United States military  academy in 1843.  He took part in most of the important  engagements of the Mexican war was promoted 1st lieutenant,  Aug. 20, 1847, brevetted captain for gallantry at Contreras and  Churubusco, major for meritorious conduct in the battle of  Molino del Rey, and on his return to New York the citizens  presented him with a sword.  He subsequently served on  scouting, frontier and recruiting duty, resigned his commission  in 1853, and was then treasurer of the proposed railroad from  New York to Syracuse via Newburg, and cashier of the Burnet  bank, Syracuse, N. Y.  He was commissioned brigadier-general of  volunteers, Aug. 9, 1861, and served in the defenses of  Washington and then in the Peninsular campaign.  He engaged in,  the siege of Yorktown and the battles of Williamsburg and Fair  Oaks; in the operations of the Seven Days’ battles before  Richmond, and on the change of base to the James river, June  26-July 2, 1862, he commanded the 2nd division of the 4th  corps.  He was promoted major-general of volunteers, July 4,  1862, and commanded a division at first composed of 9,000 men  and afterwards augmented to almost 25,000, embracing all the  Federal troops south of the James river.  He was engaged in the  operations about Suffolk, Va., and rendered valuable service by  his brilliant defense of Suffolk against a superior force under  Longstreet.  He was in command of North Carolina 1863-64, of  the Department of the East with headquarters in New York, 1864- 65, and was mustered out Aug. 24, 1865.  He then returned to  Syracuse, N. Y., and organized at that place the New York State  life insurance company, of which he was president until his  death.  He died in Syracuse, N. Y., April 28, 1878.

 

 

John James Peck

 in the U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current

Name:

John James Peck

Birth Date:

4 jan 1821

Birth Place:

Manlius, Onondaga County (Onondaga), New York, United States of America

Death Date:

21 apr 1878

Death Place:

Syracuse, Onondaga County (Onondaga), New York, United States of America

Cemetery:

Oakwood Cemetery

Burial or Cremation Place:

Syracuse, Onondaga County (Onondaga), New York, United States of America

Has Bio?:

Y

Father:

John W Peck

Mother:

Phoebe Peck

Spouse:

Rhobie H Peck

Children:

Eunice Mabel Peck
Ida Virginia Peck
James Kendrick Peck
Loomis Wells Peck
Duncan Worth Peck
Rhobie L Sargent

 John James Peck

 in the American Civil War General Officers

Name:

John James Peck

State Served:

Regular Army

Highest Rank:

Major General

Birth Date:

1821

Death Date:

1878

Birth Place:

Manlius, New York

Army:

Union

Promotions:

Promoted to Full Brig-Gen
Promoted to Full Major-Gen

Biography:

JOHN JAMES PECKPeck, John J., major-general, was born in Manlius, N. Y.,
Jan. 4, 1821, and was graduated at the United States military
academy in 1843. He took part in most of the important
engagements of the Mexican war was promoted 1st lieutenant,
Aug. 20, 1847, brevetted captain for gallantry at Contreras and
Churubusco, major for meritorious conduct in the battle of
Molino del Rey, and on his return to New York the citizens
presented him with a sword. He subsequently served on
scouting, frontier and recruiting duty, resigned his commission
in 1853, and was then treasurer of the proposed railroad from
New York to Syracuse via Newburg, and cashier of the Burnet
bank, Syracuse, N. Y. He was commissioned brigadier-general of
volunteers, Aug. 9, 1861, and served in the defenses of
Washington and then in the Peninsular campaign. He engaged in,
the siege of Yorktown and the battles of Williamsburg and Fair
Oaks; in the operations of the Seven Days’ battles before
Richmond, and on the change of base to the James river, June
26-July 2, 1862, he commanded the 2nd division of the 4th
corps. He was promoted major-general of volunteers, July 4,
1862, and commanded a division at first composed of 9,000 men
and afterwards augmented to almost 25,000, embracing all the
Federal troops south of the James river. He was engaged in the
operations about Suffolk, Va., and rendered valuable service by
his brilliant defense of Suffolk against a superior force under
Longstreet. He was in command of North Carolina 1863-64, of
the Department of the East with headquarters in New York, 1864-
65, and was mustered out Aug. 24, 1865. He then returned to
Syracuse, N. Y., and organized at that place the New York State
life insurance company, of which he was president until his
death. He died in Syracuse, N. Y., April 28, 1878.