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Finely Carved Civil War Smoking Pipe Created by a Union Soldier at City Point

$1,250

Finely Carved Civil War Smoking Pipe Created by a Union Soldier at City Point – This is one of the most skillfully carved Civil War pipes we have encountered. The wooden pipe bowl, carved in an expertly executed, raised-carving style, is in superior condition, exhibiting only a slight crack. The bowl was lined, by the soldier / carver, with a thin layer of sheet metal, so as not to damage the wooden bowl when the pipe was smoked. The raised, boldly carved inscription on the pipe bowl reads as follows:

 

“Conrad Guckes

3 NY B

City Point

1865”

 

Private (later Corporal) Guckes, a German émigré’, originally mustered into a New York infantry unit, later transferring into the 15th New York Heavy Artillery, originally part of the New York Volunteers, 3rd German Heavy Artillery. This unit was stationed in the Petersburg theater of the war, towards the end of the siege. Guckes’ reference to City Point is referring to the major supply base, established by Gen. Grant, at the confluence of the Appomattox and James Rivers, in 1864. The bowl of the pipe stands about 3” in height.

Conrad Guckes

Residence was not listed; 35 years old.  Enlisted on 4/23/1861 at New York City, NY as a Private.  On 4/23/1861 he mustered into “K” Co. NY 8th Infantry  He was transferred out on 9/1/1861 On 9/1/1861 he transferred into “B” Co. NY 15th Light Artillery  (date and method of discharge not given)

 

8th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment

 

8th Regiment New York Volunteer Infantry

Active April 23, 1861, to April 23, 1863
Country United States
Allegiance Union
Branch Infantry
Engagements Great Falls
First Battle of Bull Run
Battle of Cross Keys
Battle of New Market
Battle of Rappahannock Station I
Second Battle of Bull Run

The 8th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It was also known as the First German Rifles or Blenker’s Rifles.

Service

8th New York officers garbed in the same uniforms that they wore to the Mexican War

The regiment was organized in New York City and was mustered in for a two-year enlistment on April 23, 1861.

The regiment was mustered out of service on April 23, 1863. Men who chose to re-enlist were assigned to the 68th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment.

Casualties

The regiment suffered 103 fatalities.

 8th Infantry Regiment

Civil War
First German Rifles; Blenker’s Rifles

History

Mustered in: April 23,1861.
Mustered out: April 23,1863

The following is taken from New York in the War of the Rebellion, 3rd ed. Frederick Phisterer. Albany: J. B. Lyon Company, 1912.
This regiment, composed of Germans, was organized under State authority and recruited in New York city, and there mustered in the service of the United States for two years, April 23, 1861. It received its numerical designation, May 13, 1861, and, commanded by Col. Louis Blenker, left the State, May 26, 1861.
The regiment served at Washington, D. C., from May, 1861; in the 1st Brigade, 5th Division, Army Northeastern Virginia, from July, 1861; in Blenker’s Brigade, Division of the Potomac, from August 4, 1861; in Blenker’s Division, Army of the Potomac, from October 15, 1861; in Stahel’s Brigade, Blenker’s Division, Army of the Potomac, from January, 1862; in 1st Brigade, same division, Mountain Department, from May, 1862; in 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Corps, Army of Virginia, from June 26, 1862; and in the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 11th Corps, Army of the Potomac, from September, 1862. April 22, 1863, the three years’ men were formed in one company — Independent Company, 8th Infantry —and attached to the headquarters of the nth Corps as Provost Guard; they remained on this duty until April 5, 1864, when they were transferred to the 68th Infantry. April 23, 1863, the regiment, commanded by Col. Felix Prince Salm, was honorably discharged and mustered out at Brooks’ Station, Va.
During its service the regiment lost by death, killed in action, 64 enlisted men; of wounds received in action, 29 enlisted men; of disease and other causes, I officer, 39 enlisted men; total, 1 officer, 132 enlisted men; aggregate, 133; of whom 20 enlisted men died in the hands of the enemy.

Reorganizing

Colonel Felix Prince Salm received authority, May 11, 1863, to reorganize the 8th Regiment, of infantry, mustered out by reason of expiration of service, for a term of service of three years. This authority was revoked, October 14, 1863, and the men enlisted were assigned to the 178th Infantry.

The following is taken from The Union army: a history of military affairs in the loyal states, 1861-65 — records of the regiments in the Union army — cyclopedia of battles — memoirs of commanders and soldiers. Madison, WI: Federal Pub. Co., 1908.
Eighth Infantry.—Cols., Louis Blenker, Julius Stahel, Francis Wutschell, Felix P. Salm; Lieut.-Cols., Julius Stahel, Francis Wutschell, Carl B. Hedterich; Majs., Andrew Lutz, Carl B. Hedterich, Anthony Pokorny. The 8th (the 1st German Rifles) was recruited in New York city, there mustered into the U. S. service on April 23, 1861, for two years, and left for Washington on May 27. At Miller’s farm the troops encamped and on July 10 were ordered to move toward Manassas as part of the 2nd brigade, 4th division of the Army of the Potomac. During the battle of Bull Run the 8th was held in reserve and assisted in covering the retreat. The following winter it was quartered at Roach’s mills and Hunter’s Chapel, Va.; moved to Winchester in March, 1862, and in May joined Gen. Fremont at Petersburg, W. Va. It participated in the pursuit of Gen. Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley, and as part of Blenker’s division fought at the battles of Cross Keys and New Market. In the battle of Cross Keys its killed, wounded and missing numbered 220 out of a total of 550 engaged. At Middletown, the 8th was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 1st corps, Army of Virginia, under Gen. Pope, and with that army took part in the battles of Sulphur springs and the second Bull Run. In September, it became a part of the nth corps and reached Fredericksburg immediately after the battle; camped during the winter at Stafford Court House and Brooks’ station, and was mustered out of the service at the latter place on April 23, 1863. The members whose term of service had not expired were formed into one company, the independent company 8th N. Y., and performed guard duty at the corps headquarters until April 5, 1864, when they were assigned to the 68th N. Y. The 8th lost 93 members by death from wounds, and 40 from disease, accident and imprisonment.

 

      Colonel Louis Schirmer was authorized, May 29, 1863, to  recruit this regiment.  It was organized in New York city.   September 30, 1863, the 3d Battalion of Artillery was  transferred to it, forming Companies A, B, C, D and E; June 22,  1863, a company and other men enlisted for the 12th Artillery  were assigned to the regiment as Company F; and October 14,  1863, the 2d Battery, reorganizing, and the 34th Battery, Capt.  H. Jahn, organizing, were also transferred to it.  The  companies were mustered in the service of the United States for  three years, A, B, C, D and E at New York city, between October  14 and December 19, 1861; at Staten Island F June 19, 1863; at  Fort Lyon, Va., G, H and I August 27; K September 18; and L  December 11, 1863; at Goshen, Company M, of which the Raines  Artillery formed part, January 30, 1864.  At the expiration of  the term of service of Companies A to E, the men entitled  thereto were discharged and the companies continued in service.       The companies were recruited principally: A, C, D, E, F, H  and I at New York city; B at New York city and Philadelphia,  Pa.; G at New York city and Buffalo; K and L at New York city,  Catskill, Troy and Buffalo; and M at Monroe, New Windsor,  Liberty, Mamakating, Crawford, Warwick, Montgomery, Wallkill,  Newburgh, Goshen, Fremont, Cohecton, Callicoon, Bethel, Deer  Park and Cornwall.       Companies A to E, when assigned to the regiment, were on  duty at Fort Lyons, and the other companies were forwarded to  that point as soon as organized.  The regiment served as  infantry and heavy artillery at Fort Lyons, Va.; in the 2d, and  later in the 4th, Brigade, DeRussy’s Division, 22d Corps, from  November, 1863; in the Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac,  from March, 1864; in the 1st Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army  of the Potomac, from April, 1864; the 2d Battalion with the  Artillery Park, Army of the Potomac, and the 1st and 3d  Battalions in the Heavy Artillery Brigade, 5th Corps, Army of  the Potomac, from May 13, 1864; in the 3d Division, 5th Corps,  from May 30, 1864; in the 3d Brigade, 2d Division, 5th Corps,  from June 2, 1864; Company F in the Artillery Reserve, Army of  the Potomac, from June to December, 1864; and the regiment in  the 1st Brigade, 2d Division, 5th Corps, from August, 1864;  Company M in the Artillery Brigade, 5th Corps, from January,  1865; and the regiment in the 4th Brigade, DeRussy’s Division,  22d Corps, from June, 1865.       The regiment, commanded by Maj. Julius Dieckman, was  honorably discharged and mustered out August 22, 1865, at  Washington, D. C.

 15th Artillery Regiment

Civil War

History

Received by transfer the 3rd battalion of artillery.
Other companies mustered in: June 19, 1863, to January 30, 1864.
Mustered out: August 22, 1865.

The following is taken from New York in the War of the Rebellion, 3rd ed. Frederick Phisterer. Albany: J. B. Lyon Company, 1912.
Colonel Louis Schirmer was authorized, May 29, 1863, to recruit this regiment. It was organized in New York city. September 30, 1863, the 3d Battalion of Artillery was transferred to it, forming Companies A, B, C, D and E; June 22, 1863, a company and other men enlisted for the I2th Artillery were assigned to the regiment as Company F; and October 14, 1863, the 2d. Battery, reorganizing, and the 34th Battery, Capt. H. Jahn, organizing, were also transferred to it. The companies were mustered in the service of the United States for three years, A, B, C, D and E at New York city, between October 14 and December 19, 1861; at Staten Island F June 19, 1863; at Fort Lyon, Va., G, H and I August 27; K September 18; and L December 11, 1863; at Goshen, Company M, of which the Raines Artillery formed part, January 30, 1864. At the expiration of the term of service of Companies A to E, the men entitled thereto were discharged and the companies continued in service.
The companies were recruited principally: A, C, D, E, F, H and I at New York city; B at New York city and Philadelphia, Pa.; G at New York city and Buffalo; K and L at New York city, Catskill, Troy and Buffalo; and M at Monroe, New Windsor, Liberty, Mamakating, Crawford, Warwick, Montgomery, Wallkill, Newburgh, Goshen, Fremont, Cohecton, Callicoon, Bethel, Deer Park and Cornwall.
Companies A to E, when assigned to the regiment, were on duty at Fort Lyons, and the other companies were forwarded to that point as soon as organized. The regiment served as infantry and heavy artillery at Fort Lyons, Va.; in the 2d, and later in the 4th, Brigade, DeRussy’s Division, 22d Corps, from November, 1863; in the Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, from March, 1864; in the 1st Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, from April, 1864; the 2d Battalion with the Artillery Park, Army of the Potomac, rand the 1st and 3d Battalions in the Heavy Artillery Brigade, 5th Corps, Army of the Potomac, from May 13, 1864; in the 3d Division, 5th Corps, from May 30,1864; in the 3d Brigade, 2d Division, 5th Corps, from June 2, 1864; Company F in the Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, from June to December, 1864; and the regiment in the 1st Brigade, 2d Division, ,5th Corps, from August, 1864; Company M in the Artillery Brigade, 5th Corps, from January, 1865; and the regiment in the 4th Brigade, DeRussy’s Division, 22d Corps, from June, 1865.
The regiment, commanded by Maj. Julius Dieckman, was honorably discharged and mustered out August 22, 1865, at Washington, D. C., having, during its service, lost by •death, killed in action, 2 officers, 81 enlisted men; of wounds received in action, 6 officers, 67 enlisted men; of disease and other causes, 3 officers, 225 enlisted men; total, 11 officers, 373 enlisted men; aggregate, 384, of whom 63 enlisted men died in the hands of the enemy. The large number of men reported ” accidentally killed ” is principally caused by the explosion of a magazine at Fort Lyons, Va., June 9, 1863.

The following is taken from The Union army: a history of military affairs in the loyal states, 1861-65 — records of the regiments in the Union army — cyclopedia of battles — memoirs of commanders and soldiers. Madison, WI: Federal Pub. Co., 1908. volume II. 

FIFTEENTH ARTILLERY (HEAVY).—Cols., Louis Schirmer, Michael Wiedrich; Lieut-Cols., Michael Wiedrich, Louis Eiche; Majs., Emil Duysing, William D. Dickey, Leander Schamberger, Louis Eiche, Calvin Shaffer, Julius Dieckman.
This fine German regiment was organized at New York city, the members being principally recruited in the counties of New York, Orange and Sullivan. The 3d battalion of artillery, recruited in New York city in 1861, and which had been performing garrison duty in the defenses of Washington, was transferred to the 15th as Cos. A, B, C, D and E on Sept. 30, 1863; on June 23, 1863, a company enlisted for the 12th N.Y. artillery was assigned to the regiment as Co.F; and Oct. 14, 1863, the 2d and 34th batteries were likewise transferred to it.
The companies were mustered into the U. S. service for three years as follows: A, B, C, D and E at New York city, between Oct. 14 and Dec. 19, 1861; and the remaining companies from Aug. 27, 1863, to Jan. 30, 1864. The original members of Co. A to E were mustered out on the expiration of their term of enlistment and the remainder of the regiment continued in service.
When assigned to the regiment, Cos. A to E were on duty at Fort Lyon, Va., and the other companies joined them there as soon as organized.The regiment performed garrison duty until March, 1864, when it joined the Army of the Potomac at the front, where it was assigned to the 5th corps, to which it was attached throughout the remainder of the war, most of the time assigned to Ayres’ (2nd) division.
The regiment took part in the engagements of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, the North Anna, Totopotomoy, Cold Harbor, White Oak Swamp, the first assault on Petersburg, Weldon railroad, Poplar Grove Church, Hicksford raid, Hatcher’s run, and the Appomattox campaign, including actions at Five Forks, the fall of Petersburg and Appomattox Court House. Throughout this series of battles it was conspicuous for its steadiness and bravery, and sustained severe losses. At Spottsylvania its casualties were 160 killed, wounded and missing, among the mortally wounded was the gallant Maj. Schamberger. In the assault on the works of Petersburg in June, 1864, it lost 85 killed and wounded; at the Weldon railroad, 14 killed, 75 wounded, and 5 missing; at White Oak road, 18 killed, 81 wounded and 11 missing, among the mortally wounded being Maj. Duysing.
The regiment also lost heavily in the trenches before Petersburg from the constant and deadly firing which prevailed there, having 83 men killed, wounded and missing from this source. It lost by death during service 8 officers and 148 men, killed and mortally wounded; 5 officers and 225 men died of disease and other causes, a total of 13 officers and 373 men, of whom 63 men died in the hands of the enemy. A number of men were accidentally killed by the explosion of a magazine at Fort Lyon, Va., June 9, 1863. Under the command of Maj. Dieckman, the regiment was mustered out at Washington, D.C., Aug.22, 1865.

 15th New York Heavy Artillery


United States Regiments & Batteries > New York > Artillery & Engineers


The 15th New York Heavy Artillery Regiment lost 8 officers and 142 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded and 5 officers and 225 enlisted men to disease during the Civil War.

1861

October – December Originally organized as 3rd Battalion German Heavy Artillery at New York City
December 19 Left State for Washington, D.C.
December-March Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C.

1862

March Attached to Artillery Brigade, Military District of Washington
May Attached to Whipple’s Command, Military District of Washington
July Attached to Fort Lyon, Defenses of Washington

1863

February Attached to Tyler’s Command,

De Russy’s Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington

June Attached to 2nd Brigade, DeRussy’s Division, 22nd Army Corps
September 30 Designation of Regiment changed to 15th New York Heavy Artillery. 3rd Battalion

assigned as Companies A – E.

October Attached to 4th Brigade, De Russy’s Division, 22nd Army Corps

15th Regiment, New York Heavy Artillery

OVERVIEW:

Originally organized as 3rd Battalion German Heavy Artillery at New York City October to December, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C., December 19, 1861. Attached to Defences of Washington to March, 1862. Artillery Brigade, Military District of Washington, to May, 1862. Whipple’s Command, Military District of Washington, to July, 1862. Fort Lyon, Defences of Washington, to February, 1863. Tyler’s Command, DeRussy’s Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, DeRussy’s Division, 22nd Army Corps, to October, 1863. Designation of Regiment changed to 15th New York Heavy Artillery September 30, 1863, and 3rd Battalion assigned as Companies “A,” “B,” “C,” “D” and “E.” 4th Brigade, DeRussy’s Division, 22nd Army Corps, to February, 1864. Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 1st Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1864. Kitching’s Independent Brigade, 5th Army Corps, May, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 5th Army Corps, May 30-June 2, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, to August, 1865. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, to May, 1865. 4th Brigade, DeRussy’s Division, 22nd Army Corps, to June, 1865. 1st Brigade, DeRussy’s Division, 22nd Army Corps, to August, 1865. (Co. “F” attached to Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, June to December, 1864. Company “M” to Artillery Brigade, 5th Army Corps, January to June, 1865.)

SERVICE:

Duty in the Defences of Washington, D. C., till April, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May-June. Battle of the Wilderness May 5-7. Spottsylvania May 8-12. Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Harris Farm (or Fredericksburg Road) May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. Jericho Mills May 23. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Bethesda Church June 1-3. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Weldon Railroad June 22-23, 1864. Mine ExplosionPetersburg, July 30 (Reserve). Six-Mile House, Weldon Railroad, August 18-21. Poplar Springs Church, Peeble’s Farm, September 29-October 2. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher’s Run October 27-28. Dabney’s MillsHatcher’s Run, February 5-7, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Gravelly Run March 29. Boydton Road and White Oak Road March 31. Five Forks April 1. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. March to Washington, D. C., May. Grand Review May 23. Duty at Washington till August. Mustered out August 22, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 8 Officers and 142 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 5 Officers and 225 Enlisted men by disease. Total 380.

Predecessor units:

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS

3rd BATTALION GERMAN HEAVY ARTILLERY.

Organized at New York City. Left State for Washington, D. C., December 19, 1861. Attached to Military District of Washington to February, 1863. 1st Brigade, DeRussy’s Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, DeRussy’s Division, 22nd Army Corps, to September, 1863.

SERVICE:

Duty in the Defences of Washington, D. C., south of the Potomac till September, 1863. Consolidated with 15th New York Heavy Artillery September 30, 1863, as Companies “A,” “B,” “C,” “D” and “E.” (See 15th Heavy Artillery.)

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS

2nd BATTERY REORGANIZED.

Organization not completed and men enlisted transferred to 15th New York Heavy Artillery.