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Identified Civil War Soldier’s Stencil – Louisiana Infantry Soldier

$300

Identified Civil War Soldier’s Stencil – Louisiana Infantry Soldier – This is a typical Civil War stencil with the name: “A.D. Cassidy” jeweler stamped into the sheet brass of the stencil. The body of the stencil is folded, as most are, over a small sheet of thin iron backing. The stencil is in very good condition.

 

A.D. Cassidy, enlisting as A. D. Cassidy, as a Private, into Co. C of the 6th La. Infantry, at the war’s onset. He would later enlist, in Richmond, Va., into Co. C of the 15th La. Infantry. Cassidy served throughout the entire war, surrendering at Appomattox in April of 1865.

 

Organization: Organized with eight companies for the war at Camp Pulaski, near Amite on June 16, 1861. Increased to a regiment and designated as the 15th Infantry Regiment on July 24, 1862.

First Commander: Charles M. Bradford, LTC [resigned June 5, 1862]

Field Officers: Edmund Pendleton, MAJ, LTC [June 5, 1862]; McGavock Goodwyn, MAJ; Robert A. Wilkinson, MAJ [June 5, 1862].

Assignments: Department of Norfolk (Sep 61-Mar 62); J.R. Anderson’s Brigade, Department of North Carolina (Apr 62); J.R. Anderson’s Brigade, Department of Northern Virginia (Apr-May 62); J.R. Anderson’s Brigade, A.P. Hill’s Division, Army of Northern Virginia (May-Jun 62); J.R. Anderson’s Brigade, A.P. Hill’s Division, 1st Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (Jun-Jul 62)

Battles: Seven Days Battles (June 25-July 1, 1862); Beaver Dam Creek (June 26, 1862); Frayser’s Farm [not engaged] (June 30, 1862)

 

From Bergeron, LA Confed. Units, 156:

“This battalion was originally organized as the 2nd Regiment, Polish Brigade, at Camp Pulaski near Amite on June 16, 1861, with 678 men. When the eight companies arrived at Richmond, Virginia, in August, the War Department ordered them formed into a battalion; and this organization occurred on September 7. The battalion was ordered to Norfolk and spent the winter in camp there. On March 20, 1862, the battalion received orders to report to Goldsborough, North Carolina. There it became part of General James R. Anderson’s brigade. In April, the brigade moved by railroad to Fredericksburg, Virginia, and remained there until May, when it joined the Army of Northern Virginia near Richmond.  The battalion fought in the Battle of Beaver Dam Creek, June 26. At the Battle of Frayser’s Farm, June 30, the battalion was present but not engaged.  In August, two companies were added to the battalion to form the 15th Louisiana Regiment.”

15th Regiment Volunteer Infantry

From Sifakis, Compendium of C.S. Armies: Louisiana, 98-99:

Nickname: 2nd Regiment, Polish Brigade

Organization: Organized by the addition of two companies of the 7th Louisiana Infantry Battalion to the 3rd Infantry Battalion to form a regiment near Richmond, Virginia on July 24, 1862. Field consolidation with the 10th Infantry Regiment in 1864 and 1865. Surrendered at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, on April 9, 1865.

First Commander: Francis T. Nicholls, COL [not according to Bergeron]

Field Officers: Andrew Brady, MAJ [August 30, 1862]; McGavock Goodwyn, MAJ, LTC [August 30, 1862]; Edmund Pendleton, COL; Robert A. Wilkinson, MAJ, LTC [killed August 30, 1862]

Assignments: J. R. Anderson’s Brigade, A. P. Hill’s Division, 1st Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (Jul 62); 2nd Louisiana Brigade, McLaws’ Division, 1st Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (Jul 62); 2nd Louisiana Brigade, A. P. Hill’s Division, 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (Jul 62); 2nd Louisiana Brigade, Jackson’s-Trimble’s Division, 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (Aug 62-May 64); Consolidated Louisiana Brigade, Early’s-Gordon’s Division, 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (May-Jun 64); Consolidated Louisiana Brigade, Gordon’s Division, Valley District, Department of Northern Virginia (Jun-Dec 64); Consolidated Louisiana Brigade, Gordon’s Division, 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (Dec 64-Apr 65)

Battles: Cedar Mountain (August 9, 1862); Groveton (August 28, 1862); 2nd Manassas (August 28-30, 1862); Harpers Ferry (September 12-15, 1862); Sharpsburg (September 17, 1862); Fredericksburg [not engaged] (December 13, 1862); Chancellorsville (May 1-4, 1863); 2nd Winchester (June 14-15, 1863); Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863); Bristoe Campaign (October 1863); Mine Run Campaign (November-December 1863); Payne’s Farm (November 27, 1863); The Wilderness (May 5-6, 1864); Spotsylvania Court House (May 8-21, 1864); North Anna (May 23-26, 1864); Cold Harbor (June 1-3, 1864); Lynchburg Campaign (May-June 1864); Monocacy (July 9, 1864); Kernstown (July 24, 1864); Shepherdstown (August 25, 1864); 3rd Winchester (September 19, 1864); Fisher’s Hill (September 22, 1864); Cedar Creek (October 19, 1864); Petersburg Siege [from December] (June 1864-April 1865); Hatcher’s Run (February 5-7, 1865); Fort Stedman (March 25, 1865); Petersburg Final Assault (April 2, 1865); Sayler’s Creek (April 6, 1865); Appomattox Court House (April 9, 1865)

 

From Bergeron, LA Confed. Units, 110-11:

“This regiment was organized near Richmond, Virginia, on July 25, 1862, by the addition of two companies of the 7th Louisiana Battalion to the 3rd Louisiana Battalion. The next day, the new regiment was brigaded with the 1st, 2nd, 9th, and 10th Louisiana regiments and Coppens’ Zouave Battalion. On August 9, the regiment played a minor role in the Battle of Cedar Mountain. The men fought in the battle of Groveton, August 28, and 2nd Manassas, August 29-30; 21 men were killed, 41 were wounded, and 3 were missing. At the Battle of Sharpsburg, September 17, the regiment suffered only light casualties in the fighting around the Dunkard Church. The regiment was in reserve and did not engage in the Battle of Fredericksburg, December 13. On May 2, 1863, the regiment took part in the attack of General Stonewall Jackson’s corps on the Union flank at Chancellorsville. The men were in the continued fighting with General Joseph Hooker’s army the next day. During the Battle of Winchester, June 13-15, the regiment acted as the brigade reserve. The regiment participated in the attacks against Culp’s Hill at Gettysburg, July 2-3. By July 17, the regiment had only 17 officers and 101 enlisted men present for duty. When the army returned to Virginia, the regiment took part in the Bristoe Station Campaign, October 9-22. During the Mine Run Campaign, the men fought in the Battle of Payne’s Farm, November 27, suffering 15 casualties. The brigade fought in the Battle of the Wilderness, May 5, 1864. Federal soldiers overran the brigade’s position at Spotsylvania, May 12, capturing a number of men of the regiment and its flag. After skirmishing with the enemy near Cold Harbor, June 1-3, the brigade marched to the Shenandoah Valley. There the men participated in all the battles fought during the summer and fall—Monocacy, July 9; Winchester, July 24; Shepherdstown, August 25; Winchester, September 19; Fisher’s Hill, September 21-22; and Cedar Creek, October 19. By the end of the valley campaigns, the regiment had so few men remaining that it was consolidated with the 10th Louisiana Regiment into a single company. The men rejoined the Army of Northern Virginia at Petersburg in December. They served in the trenches there and saw action in early 1865 at Hatcher’s Run, February 6, and Fort Stedman, March 25. When the army evacuated Richmond and Petersburg, the men accompanied it on the long march to Appomattox. At the surrender on April 9, only 2 officers and 17 enlisted men were left to sign paroles. The regiment carried 901 men on its rolls during the war; 143 were killed, 98 died of disease, and 1 was executed. Approximately 130 men deserted.”