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Images, Mourning Brooches, Manual – Lt. Col. L. M. Coleman 1rst Va. Artillery Mortally WIA at Fredericksburg

$16,500

Grouping – Lt. Col. Lewis M. Coleman 1rst Va. Artillery Mortally WIA at Fredericksburg  Dec. 13, 1862 – Superior grouping of images, ephemera and jewelry all associated with Lt. Col. Lewis Minor Coleman of the 1rst Va. Artillery. This Lewis Minor Coleman (Virginia, 1827-1863) photographic and memorial archive contains the following: Sixth-plate tintype of Lewis Minor Coleman attired in his Confederate frock coat; this image is housed in a tooled leather case, 1/2″ x 3 3/4″ x 3 1/4″; cabinet card photo by A.W. Judd (1846-1929), Chattanooga, Tennessee, depicting Lewis Minor Coleman, accompanied by two aunts and another female family member. 5 1/2″ H x 6 3/4″ W; a W. A. Pratt, Richmond, VA quarter-plate daguerreotype of Lewis Minor Coleman, housed in a tooled leather case, 1/2″ x 4 3/4″ x 3 3/4″; a G. W. Minnis, Richmond, VA, a Carte de Visite of Lewis Minor Coleman, attired in his Confederate officer’s uniform, inscribed en verso: “Lewis Minor Coleman I, Lt. Col. 1st Va. Artillery, C. S. A.,” – image measures: 3 1/4″ x 2 1/4″.; a Civil War period oval, gold plated mourning/memorial brooch, laurel and oak leaf detail, with inscription en verso reading “LMC died March 21st, 1863″, 1 1/4″ x 1 3/8″.; a Civil War period, oval gold plated swivel double sided mourning/memorial brooch with swirl rope frame, not engraved but belonging to Lewis Minor Coleman, 1 1/2″ x 1 1/4″; rare edition of a heavy artillery manual belonging to Lewis Minor Coleman:

This Military instruction book signed by Major William Allen titled “Instruction for Heavy Artillery; Prepared by a Board of Officers for the use of the Army of the United States”, printed Charleston, SC 1861, Steam-Power Presses of Evans & Cogswell. 272 pages with 39 illustration plat, 12mo. Ink inscription to front end paper reading “J. R. C. Lewis. Va Service. Jamestown Island. June 4th 1861″ with inscription in pencil reading “Presented to Lewis M. Coleman by Major Wm. Allen June 10th 1862″ with additional ink inscription reading “Major Allen was one of Lee’s staff – Was a talented man & a scholar son of a ___ of Winchester M.A.C. (Mary Ambler Marshall Coleman)”. Ink inscription to inner cover and title page reading “Lewis Minor Coleman, Jr./From Grandma Coleman/for Lewis Jr./This is your grandfathers book He told me he had closely studied all the ____ – knew every strategy of battle – was very proud of his knowledge. From Grandmother M.A.C.”. 7 3/8″ H x 5 1/8″ W x 1 1/8″ D. Provenance: The Estate of Charles Boyd Coleman, Jr., Chattanooga, TN. Descended in the family of Lewis M. Coleman Jr. II (1894-1914), son of Lewis M. Coleman Jr., son of CSA Lt. Colonel Lewis Minor Coleman (1827-1863) and Mary Ambler Marshall, daughter of James K. Marshall and granddaughter of John Marshall (1755-1835). Lewis M. Coleman Jr. also was related to the family of Henry Dearborn by his marriage to Julia Wingate Boyd, daughter of Annette Maria Dearborn Boyd, who was the daughter of Greenleaf Dearborn (1786-1846) and great granddaughter of Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) on her mother’s side. Biography: “William Allan (1837-1889) was an educator, writer, and Confederate army officer during the American Civil War. A University of Virginia graduate, Allan served on the staff of Confederate general Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson and later with Jubal A. Early’s Army of the Valley. After the war, at the invitation of Robert E. Lee, Allan taught mathematics at Washington College in Lexington. There he began to write about the Civil War, collaborating on a book with the mapmaker Jedediah Hotchkiss, contributing to the debates about the Battle of Gettysburg, and publishing a memoir. Allan became popular on the Lost Cause lecture circuit, and authored a history of the Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1862 and the first volume of a history of the Army of Northern Virginia. In 1873, Allan became the first principal of McDonough Institute, a private school for poor boys near Baltimore, Maryland. He died there in 1889″.

CONDITION of Military Manual: Wear and losses to spine edge of tooled fabric cove, denting and losses to corners. Frontis page missing, small fragment remaining. Interior with some spotting and minor browning.

CONDITION (of items other than the military manual): Tintype not mounted into case, and the case hinge is split – case exhibits overall general wear. All other elements in this grouping are in overall fine condition.

Provenance: The Estate of Charles Boyd Coleman, Jr., Chattanooga, TN. Descended in the family of Lewis Minor Coleman, Jr., son of CSA Lt. Colonel Lewis Minor Coleman (1827-1863) and Mary Ambler Marshall, daughter of James K. Marshall and granddaughter of John Marshall (1755-1835).

Lewis M. Coleman Jr. was related to the family of Henry Dearborn by his marriage to Julia Wingate Boyd, daughter of Annette Maria Dearborn Boyd, who was the daughter of Greenleaf Dearborn (1786-1846) and great granddaughter of Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) on her mother’s side. Biography: “Coleman, Lewis Minor, born in Hanover county, Virginia, February 3, 1827; graduated with high honors at the University of Virginia in 1846, and became principal of the Hanover Academy; in 1859, upon the resignation of Dr. Harrison from the chair of ancient languages in the University of Virginia, Mr. Coleman, who had been a pupil of Dr. Harrison, was elected professor of Latin, and relinquished his position in the Hanover Academy to accept the same; he served in that capacity but for two years, for in 1861, at the outbreak of the Civil War, he joined the ranks of the Confederate army, in which he enlisted as captain of an artillery company which he recruited; he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel of artillery in 1862; at the Battle of Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862, he was severely wounded, and, after three months, died from his injury, March 21, 1863″. (Information according to Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume III, By: Lyon Gardiner Tyler, LL. D., Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York 1915).