Id’d Confederate Tin Drum Canteen – John Herley (Hurley, Herly) –  Capt. Daniel Shank’s Co., Horse Artillery and Capt. Shoemaker’s Co., Horse Artillery (Beauregard Rifles) Lynchburg, Va.

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Id’d Confederate Tin Drum Canteen – John Herley (Hurley, Herly) –  Capt. Daniel Shank’s Co., Horse Artillery and Capt. Shoemaker’s Co., Horse Artillery (Beauregard Rifles) Lynchburg, Va. – This diminutive, early war, tin drum canteen, possibly a pre-war, militia issue, is clearly painted, in old, white paint, on one side:

J HEARLY

LYNCHBURG

BEAUGREGARD

RIFLES

Painted black, the canteen is convex on one side and flat on the other. There are three sling guides, soldered to the sides of the canteen, through which a significant portion of the original leather sling remains. The crudely, soldered-seamed, tin mouthpiece remains in place, stoppered by an old cork that appears to be the original stopper. The canteen remains in overall, very good condition, exhibiting some dings from field use. The black paint, typical of Confederate use, remains in very good condition, as well. John Herley (spelled in multiple ways in the various records and associated research) enlisted as a private, in May of 1861, in Lynchburg, into the Virginia Light Artillery, also known, in the period, as Capt. Daniel Shank’s Co., Horse Artillery, Capt. Shoemaker’s Co., Horse Artillery (Beauregard Rifles, the Lynchburg Beauregards). Herley had a rather interesting military career – serving throughout the majority of the war – he was reduced in rank, then reinstated for meritorious service, wounded at Culpeper Courthouse, and ultimately paroled, at the end of the war, at Lynchburg, in May, 1865. His regiment saw service, for most of the war, in the Army of Northern Virginia; they would see considerable action during the Seven Days Campaign and at Second Manassas, Harper’s Ferry, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Brandy Station and the Siege of Petersburg. This is a fine example of an identified Confederate, battle carried canteen.

Measurements: Diameter – approx. 5”; Width – 2.5”

John Herley

Residence was not listed;

Enlisted on 5/10/1861 at Lynchburg, VA as a 3rd Corpl.

He was listed as:

* Wounded 10/11/1863 Culpeper Court House, VA

* Returned 8/15/1864 (place not stated) (Estimated day)

* Paroled 4/13/1865 Lynchburg, VA

Promotions:

* Priv (Often reduced,but reinstated for gallantry.)

* 4th Sergt 8/15/1861

* 3rd Sergt 8/15/1864

He also had service in:

VA Lynchburg Light Artillery

 

 

 

NAME: John Herley
ENLISTMENT DATE: 10 May 1861
ENLISTMENT PLACE: Lynchburg, Virginia
ENLISTMENT RANK: 3rd Corpl
MUSTER PLACE: Virginia
MUSTER REGIMENT: Lynchburg LA
MUSTER REGIMENT TYPE: Artillery
MUSTER INFORMATION: Enlisted
RANK CHANGE RANK: Priv
RANK CHANGE INFORMATION: Often reduced, but reinstated for gallantry.
CASUALTY DATE: 11 Oct 1863
CASUALTY PLACE: Culpeper Court House, Virginia
TYPE OF CASUALTY: Wounded
SIDE OF WAR: Confederacy
SURVIVED WAR?: Yes
NOTES: 1864-08-15 Returned, Estimated day; 1865-04-13 Paroled, (Lynchburg, VA)

 

NAME: John Herley
AGE: 19
BIRTH DATE: 1842
ENLISTMENT DATE: 1861
MILITARY UNIT: Capt. Daniel Shank’s Co., Horse Artillery AND Capt. Shoemaker’s Co., Horse Artillery (Beauregard Rifles, Lynchburg Beauregards)

Lynchburg VA Light Artillery Battery

Organized: Campbell County, VA on 4/19/61
Mustered Out: 4/9/65

 

From To Brigade Division Corps Army Comment
Jul ’61 Apr ’62 Artillery Dept of Norfolk
Jun ’62 Jul ’62 Mahone’s Huger’s/R.H. Anderson’s Army of Northern Virginia
Jul ’62 Sep ’62 Mahone’s R.H. Anderson’s 1st Army of Northern Virginia
Dec ’62 Sep ’63 Horse Artillery Cavalry Army of Northern Virginia
Sep ’63 May ’64 Horse Artillery Cavalry Army of Northern Virginia
Sep ’64 Mar ’65 Horse Artillery Rosser’s Valley District Dept of Northern Virginia
Mar ’65 Apr ’65 Breathed’s Horse Artillery Cavalry Army of Northern Virginia

Lynchburg Beauregard Rifles (Virginia) Artillery

Confederate Regiments & Batteries * Virginia

“Moorman’s Battery”

1861
April 19 Organized at Lynchburg as a Zouave company for one year under the command of Captain Marcellus Newton Moorman (VMI Class of 1856).
May 16 Enlisted for one years service.
July Equipped as artillery and assigned to Artillery Battalion, Department of Norfolk.
1862
April Reorganized for the duration of the war.
June-July Assigned to MahSone’s Brigade, Huger’s-R.H. Anderson’s Division, Army of Northern Virginia.
June 25-July 1 Seven Days Battles

The battery lost five casualties.

June 30 Brackett’s
July 1 Malvern Hill
July Assigned to Saunders’ Artillery Battalion, R.H. Anderson’s Division, Longstreet’s Command, Army of Northern Virginia.
August 28-30 Second Battle of Manassas (Bull Run)
September 12-15 Harpers Ferry
September 17 Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam)

Captain Moorman commanded the battery, which was equipped with two 10-pounder Parrott Rifles and one other unidentified piece. One of the Parrotts was damaged.

From the marker to Saunders Artillery Battalion that was at one time (currently missing) in the battlefield:

Between 9 and 10 A.M. of the 17th, the four Batteries of this Battalion, under command of Captain Carey F. Grimes, went into position on this ridge in support of the Infantry engaged on the high ground northeast. Grimes’ (Virginia) Battery was on the immediate right of the pike, Moorman’s (Virginia) Battery, on Grimes’ right and between it and Piper’s Stone Barn, Huger’s (Virginia) Battery was immediately west of the pike, and Donaldsonville (Louisiana) Artillery (Maurin’s Battery) on Huger’s left, on the rising ground 140 to 170 yards northwest of this. The Battalion was subjected to heavy fire of Federal Artillery and musketry; Captain Grimes was mortally wounded about 60 yards east of this by a musket ball, many men and horses were killed and wounded, some of the guns were disabled and the Battalion was withdrawn toward Sharpsburg by Major John S. Saunders who was not present when it went into action.

Later in the day parts of the command assisted in checking the advance of the Ninth Corps on Sharpsburg.

October 4 Personnel from the disbanded Portsmouth Light Artillery transferred in.
November Converted to horse artillery and assigned to Horse Artillery Battalion, Cavalry Division, Army of Northern Virginia.
December 4 Port Royal
December 13 Battle of Fredericksburg
1863
April 14-15 Rappahannock Bridge
May 1-4 Battle of Chancellorsville
June 9 Battle of Brandy Station
July 1-3 Battle of Gettysburg

The battery brought 112 men to the battle but was not engaged.

July 6-10 Funkstown and Boonesborough
September-May Assigned to Horse Artillery Battalion, Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia.
1864
February 29 Stannardsville
April 15 Captain Moorman was promoted to major and given command of an artillery battaion i the Second Corps. Captain John J. Shoemaker took over command of the battery.
June 15 Siege of Petersburg
September Assigned to Horse Artillery Battalion, Rosser’s Cavalry Division, Valley District, Army of Northern Virginia.
1865
March Assigned to Breathed’s Battalion, Horse Artillery, Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia.
April 9 Disbanded at Lynchburg.

 

Shoemaker’s Company, Virginia Horse Artillery (Beauregard Rifles) (Confederate)

Shoemaker’s Company, Virginia Horse Artillery (Beauregard Rifles) (Confederate)

Brief History

Shoemaker’s Company, Virginia Horse Artillery (Beauregard Rifles) (Confederate)[also called Lynchburg Horse Artillery or Beauregard’s Rifles] was organized at Lynchburg, Virginia, in April, 1861. The unit was assigned to J.S. Saunder’s, J. Pelham’s, R.F. Beckham’s, and J. Breathed’s Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia. It was disbanded at Lynchburg on April 9, 1865. Its commanders were Captains Marcellus N. Moorman and John J. Shoemaker.

Shoemaker’s Company, Virginia Horse Artillery (Beauregard Rifles) (Lynchburg Beauregards)

OVERVIEW:

Moorman’s-Shoemaker’s Battery [also called Lynchburg Horse Artillery or Bearegard’s Rifles] was organized at Lynchburg, Virginia, in April, 1861. The unit was assigne to J.S. Saunder’s, J. Pelham’s, R.F. Beckham’s, and J. Breathed’s Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia. It fought in many conflicts from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, moved with Early to the Shenandoah Valley, and took part in the Appomattox Campaign. This company sustained 5 casualties during the Seven Days’ Battles, took 112 effectives to Gettysburg but was not engaged, and disbanded at Lynchburg on April 9, 1865. Its commanders were Captains Macellus N. Moorman and John J. Shoemaker.