Rare Pair of Confederate Id’d 6th Va. Cavalry Boots

$1,150

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Rare Pair of Confederate Id’d 6th Va. Cavalry Boots – When we obtained these boots, tucked in one of the boots, was a folded book, back board; opening the folded board revealed the following, crudely penciled inscription:

 

Boots WAREN (sic)

BY S CLINTON ADAMS

SIXTH VIRGINIA

CALVARY (sic)”

 

Drawn above this inscription is an ANV battle flag. The boots are definitively Civil War period boots, exhibiting the following mid-19th century characteristics: Cuban style, stacked heels; wooden pegged and sewn soles; fabric boot pulls inside the boot proper; scalloped knee and back areas; decoratively stitched, pebble grain leather upper sections. The leather of the boots remains in overall good, strong condition, with each boot evidencing some rodent chew holes; each boot also retains some traces of war period horse manure.

Both S. Clinton Adams and his brother, Thomas Franklin Adams, both served in Co. K of the 6th Va. Cavalry throughout the entire war. Both Adams brothers were captured, during their service. Stephen C. Adams was actually imprisoned twice; Thomas Adams was captured in the Fall of 1864 and took the Oath of Allegiance, at Point Lookout, at the end of the war. During the process of research, we found a now well known image of the Adams brothers, both wearing Confederate battle shirts, at the onset of the war. There seems to be some disagreement as to which of the two depicted in the image is Stephen and which is Thomas; we have included here, in this overview, the thoughts of a direct descendant regarding the identification of the two, in the image. Some have suggested that the younger of the two brothers, in the image, may actually have been S.C. Adams’ wife, Elizabeth. A short article in “America’s Civil War” implying this possibility, is included here, as well as a rebuttal of that article, sent to us by an interested collector**. We have had many pairs of Civil War boots, but this is the first pair of cavalry boots, identified to a Confederate trooper.

Stephen Clinton Adams

Residence was not listed; 25 years old. Enlisted on 5/22/1861 as a Private. On 5/22/1861 he mustered into “K” Co. VA 6th Cavalry (date and method of discharge not given)   He was listed as: * POW 9/13/1862 (place not stated) * Confined 9/15/1862 Old Capitol Prison, Washington, DC * Exchanged 11/10/1862 (place not stated) * AWOL 2/28/1865 (place not stated) (Final roll) * POW 3/31/1865 Fredericks Hall, VA * Oath Allegiance 6/22/1865 Point Lookout, MD (Released)   Promotions: * Sergt 11/1/1862   Other Information: born 1/16/1836 in Frederick County, MD died in 1877   Buried: Leesburg Union Cemetery, Leesburg, VA (Married Elizabeth Nichols.)

 

ADAMS, STEPHEN CLINTON: b. 1/16/36 in Frederick Co., Md. enl. 5/22/61 in Co. K POW 9/13/62, hold at Old Capitol Prison; exchanged 11/10/62 To Sgt. 11/1/62 AWOL on final 1‑2/65 roll. POW at Frederick Hall 3/13/65. Took the oath at Pt. Lookout 6/22/65. M. Elizabeth Nichols. d. 1877, bur. Leesburg Union Cem. 

 

 

                               NAME: Stephen Clinton Adams
ENLISTMENT AGE: 25
BIRTH DATE: 16 Jan 1836
BIRTH PLACE: Frederick County, Maryland
ENLISTMENT DATE: 22 May 1861
ENLISTMENT RANK: Private
MUSTER DATE: 22 May 1861
MUSTER PLACE: Virginia
MUSTER COMPANY: K
MUSTER REGIMENT: 6th Cavalry
MUSTER REGIMENT TYPE: Cavalry
MUSTER INFORMATION: Enlisted
RANK CHANGE DATE: 1 Nov 1862
RANK CHANGE RANK: Sergt
IMPRISONMENT DATE: 13 Sep 1862
IMPRISONMENT 2 DATE: 31 Mar 1865
IMPRISONMENT 2 PLACE: Fredericks Hall, Virginia
SIDE OF WAR: Confederacy
SURVIVED WAR?: Yes
DEATH DATE: 1877
BURIAL PLACE: Leesburg, Virginia
CEMETERY: Leesburg Union Cemetery
NOTES: 1862-09-15 Confined, (Old Capitol Prison, Washington, DC); 1862-11-10 Exchanged; 1865-02-28 AWOL, Final roll; 1865-06-22 Oath Allegiance, (Point Lookout, MD), Released
ADDITIONAL NOTES: Married Elizabeth Nichols.

 

 

Stephen Clinton Adams

BIRTH 16 Jan 1836

Loudoun County, Virginia, USA

DEATH 4 Jun 1877 (aged 41)

Loudoun County, Virginia, USA

BURIAL Union Cemetery

Leesburg, Loudoun County, Virginia, USA

Thomas Franklin Adams is my great, great grandfather. His younger half-brother was Stephen Clinton Adams. Always wondered if the other person in the picture (see image of the Adams brothers) was Thomas F. Adams. They were both members of Co. K 6th VA Calvary.

**Info. from collector:

Attached is the ACW article (see this article in the pictures’ section) and my response.  It was your website that broke loose the truth, by providing a full history of Stephen Clinton Adams (born January 16, 1836 in Frederick County, Maryland) and Thomas Franklin Adams (born December 29, 1834 in Loudoun County, Va.).  By way of supplementing what is on your website, following is what I found on familysearch.com (ages in parentheses):

1850 census: Sarah (2) in household of Isaac [Gibson] and Louisa [White] Nichols. Stephen (13) and Thomas (15) in household of Henry and *vanner Adams, Loudoun County, Va.

1860 Census: Sarah E. (12) in household of Isaac and Louisa Nichols. Thomas (26) and Clinton (23) were farm hands living together in Buckeystown (Frederick County), Maryland.

Marriage Records: On July 5, 1863, Thomas F. Adams (23)  married Frances Jane “Fannie” Dove (24) (they would have five children). On March 10, 1868, Sarah Elizabeth Nichols (20) married Stephen C. Adams (28) in Loudoun County, Va.

1870 census:  Neither S.C. nor T.F. found.

1880: Thomas F. and Fannie Adams living in Loudoun County, Va.  S.C. was deceased, and his widow was not found.

1900: Sarah E. Adams (52) living with (brother?) Levi Nichols in Loudoun County, Va. T. F. not found.

1910, 1920 and 1930: Elizabeth Adams living with daughter and son-in-law Harry B. and Louise Anderson at Mt. Gilead (Loudoun County), Va.

Findagrave: On June 4, 1877, Stephen Clinton Adams died and is buried at Union Cemetery, Leesburg (Loudoun County), Va. On September 21, 1910, Frances Jane “Fannie” Dove Adams died in Clifton, Fairfax County. On May 19, 1920, Thomas F. Adams died at the Soldier’s Home in Richmond and is buried at Hollywood Cemetery in that city. On October 8, 1934, Sarah Elizabeth Adams (born May 26, 1848) died and lies at Union Cemetery, Leesburg, Va.

This information establishes conclusively that S.C.’s comrade could not be S.C.’s wife, since S.C.’s wife was only 13 or 14 in 1861, when the pictures were probably taken.  The comrade looks closer to the age T.F. was in 1861 (i.e., 26).  So the unidentified comrade is more likely Thomas Franklin Adams; though absent some inscription in the case we will never know for sure.

Thomas F. Adams

Residence Loudoun County VA; Enlisted at Leesburg, VA as a Private (date unknown). He also had service in: “K” Co. VA 6th Cavalry Other Information: born 12/29/1834 in Loudoun County, VA died 5/18/1920 in Richmond, VA Buried: Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, VA

ADAMS, THOMAS F.: b. 12/29/34 in Loudoun Co. enl. 6/1/61 in Co. K POW at Waynesboro 9/24/64. Took the oath at Pt. Lookout 6/22/65 Resid. Clifton Station, Fairfax Co., as a farmer postwar. d. at Lee Camp Soldiers’ Home, Richmond, 5/19/20, bur. Hollywood Cem. 

 

Name: Thomas F Adams
Birth Date: 29 Dec 1834
Birth Place: Loudoun County, Virginia
Enlistment Place: Leesburg, Virginia
Enlistment Rank: Private
Muster Place: Virginia
Muster Company: K
Muster Regiment: 6th Cavalry
Muster Regiment Type: Cavalry
Muster Information: Enlisted
Side of War: Confederacy
Survived War?: Yes
Residence Place: Loudoun County, Virginia
Death Date: 18 May 1920
Death Place: Richmond, Virginia
Burial Place: Richmond, Virginia

Thomas F. Adams

Taken (see photo of T.F. Adams tombstone in the Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Richmond City, Virginia)

6th VA Cavalry

Organized: on 9/12/61
Mustered Out: 4/9/65

 

From To Brigade Division Corps Army Comment
Sep ’61 Nov ’61 Cavalry Army of Potomac
Nov ’61 Mar ’62 Cavalry Potomac District Dept of Northern Virginia
Mar ’62 May ’62 Cavalry Ewell’s Dept of Northern Virginia
May ’62 Jun ’62 Cavalry Ewell’s Valley District Dept of Northern Virginia
Jun ’62 Jul ’62 Cavalry Valley District Dept of Northern Virginia
Aug ’62 Dec ’62 Robertson’s/Jones’ Cavalry Army of Northern Virginia
Dec ’62 May ’63 Jones’ Valley District Dept of Northern Virginia
May ’63 Sep ’63 Jones’ Cavalry Army of Northern Virginia
Sep ’63 Sep ’63 Jones’ Hampton’s Cavalry Army of Northern Virginia
Sep ’63 Jul ’64 Lomax’s Fitz. Lee’s Cavalry Army of Northern Virginia
Aug ’64 Feb ’65 Lomax’s/Payne’s Fitz. Lee’s/Rosser’s Valley District Dept of Northern Virginia
Feb ’65 Apr ’65 Payne’s Fitz. Lee’s Cavalry Army of Northern Virginia

Brief History

This Unit completed its organization in November 1861, at Manassas, Virginia. Only 3 men surrendered on April 9, 1865, as most of the cavalry cut through the Federal lines and later disbanded. Field officers: Colonels Charles W. Field, Thomas S. Flournoy, John S. Green, and Julien Harrison; Lieutenant Colonels J. Grattan Cabell and Daniel T. Richards; and Majors Cabell E. Flournoy and Daniel A. Grimsley.

Companies in this Regiment with the Counties of Origin

Men often enlisted in a company recruited in the counties where they lived though not always. After many battles, companies might be combined because so many men were killed or wounded. However if you are unsure which company your ancestor was in, try the company recruited in his county first.

  • Men of this unit were raised in Loudoun, Rappahannock, Clarke, Rockingham, Pittsylvania, Fairfax, Halifax, Fauquier, and Orange counties.

Company A (Dulany Troop or Loudoun Dragoons) – many men from Loudoun County

Company B (Rappahannock Cavalry) – many men from Rappahannock County

Company C (Rockingham Cavalry, River Rangers) – many men from Rappahannock County

Company D (Clarke Cavalry) – many men from Clarke County

Company F (Fairfax Company) (Washington’s Home Guard)(The Powell Troop) or(General Johnston’s Bodyguard Company) – many men from Fairfax County

Company G ( Flournoy Troop) – many men from Halifax County

Company H (The Wise Dragoons) – many men from Fauquier County

Company  I  (Orange Rangers) – many men from Orange County

Company  K (The Loudoun Cavalry or Leesburg Cavalry)

6th Virginia Cavalry Regiment

 

6th Virginia Cavalry Regiment
Active November 1861 – April 1865
Disbanded April 1865
Country  Confederate States of America
Allegiance  Virginia
Branch  Confederate States Army
Role Cavalry
Engagements Jackson’s Valley Campaign
Seven Days’ Battles
Second Battle of Bull Run
Battle of Antietam
Battle of Fredericksburg
Battle of Chancellorsville
Battle of Brandy Station
Battle of Gettysburg
Bristoe Campaign
Overland Campaign
Siege of Petersburg
Valley Campaigns of 1864
Appomattox Campaign
Battle of Five Forks
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Colonel Charles W. Field
Colonel Thomas S. Flournoy
Colonel John S. Green
Colonel Julien Harrison

The 6th Virginia Cavalry Regiment was a cavalry regiment raised in Virginia for service in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. It fought mostly with the Army of Northern Virginia.

Virginia’s 6th Cavalry completed its organization in November, 1861, at Manassas, Virginia. Men of this unit were raised in Loudoun, Rappahannock, Clarke, Rockingham, Pittsylvania, Fairfax, Halifax, Fauquier, and Orange counties.

The unit served in Robertson’s, “Grumble” Jones’, Lomax’s, and Payne’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. It fought in Jackson’s Valley Campaign and in the conflicts at Second Bull Run, Brandy Station, Upperville, Fairfield, Bristoe, Mine Run, The Wilderness, Todd’s Tavern, Spotsylvania, Haw’s Shop, and Cold Harbor. The regiment went on to take part in Early’s Shenandoah Valley operations and the Appomattox Campaign.

Only 3 men surrendered on April 9, 1865, as most of the cavalry cut through the Federal lines and later disbanded. The field officers were Colonels Charles W. FieldThomas FlournoyJohn S. Green, and Julien Harrison; Lieutenant Colonels J. Grattan Cabell and Daniel T. Richards; and Majors Cabell E. Flournoy and Daniel A. Grimsley.

Commanding officer Thomas Flournoy had been a United States Congressman as well as an unsuccessful candidate from the American Party for Virginia governor.

Company A was known as both the Loudoun Dragoons and The Dulany Troop, Company E was known as the Pittsylvania Dragoons and Company K was known as the Loudoun Cavalry. Company I was known as the Orange Rangers.[1]

Field officers

  • Colonel Charles W. Field
  • Colonel Thomas S. Flourney, Commanding Officer on the Sharpsburg Campaign[2]
  • Colonel John S. Green
  • Colonel Julien Harrison
  • Lieutenant Colonel J. Grattan Cabell
  • Lieutenant Colonel Daniel T. Richards
  • Major Cabell E. Flournoy
  • Major Daniel A. Grimsley[3]

6th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry

OVERVIEW:

6th Cavalry Regiment completed its organization in November, 1861, at Manassas, Virginia. Men of this unit were raised in Loudoun, Rappahannock, Clarke, Rockingham, Pittsylvania, Fairfax, Halifax, Fauquier, and Orange counties. The unit served in Robertson’s, W.E. Jones’, Lomax’s, and Payne’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. It fought in Jackson’s Valley Campaign and in the conflicts at Second ManassasBrandy StationUpperville, Fairfield, BristoeMine RunThe Wilderness, Todd’s Tavern, SpotsylvaniaHaw’s Shop, and Cold Harbor. The regiment went on to take part in Early’s Shenandoah Valley operations and the Appomattox Campaign. Only 3 men surrendered on April 9, 1865, as most of the cavalry cut through the Federal lines and later disbanded. The field officers were Colonels Charles W. Field, Thomas S. Flourney, John S. Green, and Julien Harrison; Lieutenant Colonels J. Grattan Cabell and Daniel T. Richards; and Majors Cabell E. Flournoy and Daniel A. Grimsley.

6th Virginia Cavalry Regiment

Confederate Regiments & Batteries * Virginia

1861
September 12 Organized at Manassas with seven companies under the command of Colonel Charles W. Field (West Point Class of 1849), Lieutenant Colonel Julien Harrison and Major John G. Cabell. Assigned to Robertson’s Cavalry Brigade
September 31 Company C was created.
October 9 Company D was transferred from  Company D of  the 6th Virginia Cavalry.
November Completed organization and was assigned to Cavalry Brigade, Potomac District, Department of Northern Virginia
December 4 Burke’s Station
1862
March Assigned to Cavalry, Ewell’s Division, Army of the Valley. Colonel Field was promoted to brigadier general and given command of an infantry brigade.
April 15-18 Lieutenant Colonel Harrison was promoted to colonel, Major Cabell was promoted to lieutenant colonel, and Captain Thomas Flournoy was promoted to major.
May Assigned to Cavalry, Ewell’s Division, Department of Northern Virginia
May 23
Battle of Front Royal
May 25
Battle of Winchester
June 8
Cross Keys
June 9
Port Republic
June 12-15 Stuart’s Ride Around McClellan
June 27
Gaines’s Mill
June-July Assigned to Cavalry Brigade, Army of the Valley
July 16 Colonel Harrison resigned. Major Thomas Flournoy was promoted to colonel, Major John S. Green was promoted to lieutenant colonel and Captain Cabell Flournoy (Thomas’ son) was promoted to major.
August Assigned to Robertson’s-Jones’s Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of Northern Virginia
August 9
Battle of Cedar Mountain
August 22 Catlett’s Station
August 23 Warrenton Springs
August 28-30
Second Battle of Manassas (Bull Run)
September 14
Battle of South Mountain
September 17
Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam)

Commanded by Colonel Thomas S. Flournoy.

October 15 Colonel Flournoy resigned. Former Colonel Harrison was reappointed to colonel.
October 16 Charleston
December Assigned to Jones’s Brigade, Army of the Valley
1863
January 2-5 Morefield-Petersburg Expedition
April 20-May 21 Jone’s and Imboden’s West Virginia Raid
April 25 Greenland Gap
April 29 Fairmont
May Assigned to Jones’s Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of Northern Virginia
June 9
Battle of Brandy Station

Colonel Harrison was wounded in the left thigh. He never returned to field service and retired to the Invalid Corps.

June 21 Battle of Millville
June 30
Battle of Hanover
July 1-3
Battle of Gettysburg

The regiment was commanded by Major Cabell E. Flournoy. It was not on the field at Gettysburg but took active part in the campaign.

From the monument to Jones’s Cavalry Brigade at Gettysburg:

July 1. The 12th Regiment was detached and remained on the south side of the Potomac River. White’s 35th Virginia Battalion was also detached. The remaining regiments crossed the Potomac at Williamsport Md.

July 2. Marched from near Greencastle Pa. to Chambersburg Pa.

July 3. The Brigade marched from Chambersburg Pa. via Cashtown to Fairfield Pa. Met the 6th U. S. Cavalry about two miles from Fairfield. The 7th Virginia charged in the advance and was repulsed. The 6th Virginia in support charged and forced the Union Regiment to retire with heavy loss. The Brigade encamped at Fairfield for the night.

July 4. The Brigade held the mountain passes and picketed the left flank of the Army.

July 7 Funkstown
July
Williamsport
August 11 White Post
August 13 Auburn
September Assigned to Jones’s Brigade, Hampton’s Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia
September 19 Lieutenant Colonel Cabell, a medical doctor and surgeon, was appointed superintendent at the Jackson Hospital in Richmond.
Late September Assigned to Lomax’s Brigade, F. Lee’s-Rosser’s Cavalry Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia
October
Bristoe Campaign
November-December
Mine Run Campaign
1864
April 23 Lieutenant Colonel Green resigned “for the good of the service”
May 5-6
Battle of the Wilderness
May 8-21
Battle of Spotsylvania Court House
May 11
Yellow Tavern

Captain Daniel Richards was wounded.

May 22-26
Battle of North Anna
May 31 Major Cabell Flournoy was killed.
June 1-3
Battle of Cold Harbor

Colonel Cabell Carrington Flournoy was killed.

June 11
Battle of Trevilian’s Station
June
Siege of Petersburg
August Assigned to Lomax’s-Payne’s Brigade, F. Lee’s-Rosser’s Cavalry Division, Army of the Valley
August 25
Reames’s Station
September 3 Captain Daniel T Richards of Company D was promoted to lieutenant colonel and Captain Daniel Grimsley of Company B was promoted to major
September 19
Third Battle of Winchester
September 24 Lieutenant Colonel Richards was wounded at Luray.
September 26-27 Weyer’s Cave
October 9
Battle of Tom’s Brook
October 19
Battle of Cedar Creek
October 28 New Creek
1865
February Assigned to Payne’s Bigade, F. Lee’s Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia
April 1
Battle of Five Forks
April 7
High Bridge
April 9
Appomattox Court House

Most of the army’s cavalry cut through Federal lines and escaped. Only three men surrendered at Appomattox.

6th Virginia Cavalry, Co. K

Company mustered in on September 12th, 1861 at Manassas, Virginia. Company mustered out of service on April 9th, 1865 at Appottomax Court House, Virginia.

Notable Battles:

  • Upperville fought on June 21st, 1863 near Upperville, Virginia (4 wounded, 0 died, 0 imprisoned)
  • Five Forks fought on April 1st, 1865 near Five Forks, Virginia (0 wounded, 0 died, 6 imprisoned)

Facts about this Company:

  • Number of Soldiers: 162
  • First Enlistment Date: 1861-01-01 (1 soldier)
  • Most Common Enlistment Place: Leesburg, Virginia (2 soldiers)
  • Most Common Enlistment Date: 1861-04-22 (42 soldiers)
  • Most Common Muster Out Date: 1862-04-20 (3 soldiers)
  • Youngest Soldier at Enlistment: 14 — Grimes, William Henry (Private)
  • Oldest Soldier at Enlistment: 39 — Clowe, William H (Private)
  • Average Age at Enlistment: 23.5 years old
  • Median Age at Enlistment: 22.0 years old
  • Wounded In Regiment: 31 (19%)
  • Prisoner Of War While In Regiment: 50 (30%)
  • Soldiers That Died While In Regiment: 14 (8%)
  • Soldiers That Died While In War: 23 (14%)

Soldier List: (#Prisoner Of War, ^Wounded, %=Died during war)

  • Abbott, Joseph (Bugler)
  • Adams, Stephen Clinton #
  • Adams, Thomas F