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Identified Eagle Drum – Drummer of the 76th NY – WIA at Gettysburg

ON HOLD

Identified Eagle Drum – Drummer of the 76th NY – WIA at Gettysburg – This eagle drum remains in overall very good condition, evidencing original field wear and use; it retains its original roping, several of the original leather tension ears, the original gut snares, original brass snare tightening device and both original upper and lower drum heads. The paint on the drum is completely original and has not been enhanced or so-called “restored”. Impressed into the lower red painted, rim, is the name of the well-known, war period drum maker “A. ROGERS”. Alexander Rogers, who’s shop was in Flushing, New York (starting in 1860), made drums for the Union Army, throughout the war; he made up to 2500 to 3000 drums, with his last 500 contracted to the Federal Army, in January of 1864. This drum appears to have been contracted for a New York regiment, some time in the early or mid-war period, as impressed on the upper rim is the following: “A.W. NEWCOMB / INSPECTOR N.Y.”, indicating that this drum was constructed under a New York state contract and not for a regular army regiment. Significantly, stenciled, in large letters, on the lower head, is the name “J. WRIGHT”. John Wright enlisted in Co. F, of the 30th NY Infantry in October of 1862, as a drummer. He remained with the 30th until May 25, 1863, when he transferred into Co. G, of the 76th NY Infantry. During the course of his service, in both regiments, he would see action at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, The Wilderness, The Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, Cold Harbor, and the Siege of Petersburg. Wright is listed as being wounded in action, on July1, 1863, at the Battle of Gettysburg. He was promoted to the rank of Corporal on October 30, 1864. As with many of the Civil War field drums, this drum was cut down, in the period, to make it more readily carried and played by the drummers; the diameter of the drum remains its original size at around 16”; the height is 13”, having been cut down slightly by about 2” or 2.5”. Regardless, virtually all of the eagle remains visible, with the exception of its talons, which are behind the lower rim. The original tack pattern is in place, as well. We have had other Civil War field drums, but only one or two that were identified to a specific regiment; this drum is not only identified to two heavily engaged regiments, it also has the extreme rarity of having the name of the original drummer stenciled on the drum, as well as having the maker and military inspector’s names impressed.

John Wright

 

Residence was not listed; 18 years old.  Enlisted on 9/22/1862 at Albany, NY as a Drummer.  On 10/16/1862 he mustered into “F” Co. NY 30th Infantry  He was transferred out on 5/25/1863 On 5/25/1863 he transferred into NY 76th Infantry  (date and method of discharge not given) 

30th NY Infantry
( 2-years )

Organized: Troy, NY on 6/1/61
Mustered Out: 6/18/63 at Albany, NYOfficers Killed or Mortally Wounded: 6
Officers Died of Disease, Accidents, etc.: 2
Enlisted Men Killed or Mortally Wounded: 72
Enlisted Men Died of Disease, Accidents, etc.: 31
(Source: Fox, Regimental Losses)

 

From

To

Brigade

Division

Corps

Army

Comment

Aug ’61 Oct ’61 Keyes’ Army of Potomac New Organization
Oct ’61 Mar ’62 1 McDowell’s Army of Potomac
Mar ’62 Apr ’62 1 3 1 Army of Potomac
Apr ’62 Jun ’62 1 King’s Department of Rappahannock
Jun ’62 Sep ’62 1 1 3 Army of Virginia
Sep ’62 Jun ’63 1 1 1 Army of Potomac Mustered Out

 

 

 

 

30th Regiment New York Volunteer Infantry

Active June 1, 1861, to June 18, 1863
Country United States
Allegiance Union
Branch Infantry
Engagements Battle of Second Bull Run
Battle of South Mountain
Battle of Antietam
Battle of Chancellorsville

The 30th New York Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War from the state of New York. It was a part of the famed Eastern Iron Brigade in the Army of the Potomac.

The 30th New York was mustered into service on June 1, 1861, and mustered out of service on June 18, 1863, following expiration of its enlistment term. Col. Edward Frisby initially commanded the regiment, which was organized in Troy, New York. Originally enlisted soldiers for two-year enlistments and later received 3-year men, who were later folded into the 76th New York Infantry on May 24, 1863.

Total strength and casualties

The regiment suffered 6 officers and 72 enlisted men who were killed in action or mortally wounded and 3 officers and 31 enlisted men who died of disease, for a total of 111 fatalities.

Commanders

  • Colonel Edward Frisby Born in 1827, Frisby had a long distinguished record in the New York State Militia, retiring in 1860 with the rank of Brigadier General. He was commissioned in 1861 to lead the newly formed 30th Volunteers. He was killed at the 2nd Battle of Bull Run on August 29, 1862. He is buried in the Albany Rural Cemetery.

Diaries

At least two enlisted men kept diaries during the time they served with the 30th New York – John Gordon Morrison (Morrison was later awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his service in the River War) and James Reed. Both men were Irish-born residents of Lansingburgh, New York who joined the unit at the time of its creation. Their daily entries provide a great deal of information about ordinary soldiers’ day-to-day experience of the first months of the war.

 

 

NEW YORK
THIRTIETH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY.
(Two Years)

30th Infantry Regiment
Civil War

History

Mustered in: June 1, 1861
Mustered out: June 18, 1863

The following is taken from New York in the War of the Rebellion, 3rd ed. Frederick Phisterer. Albany: J. B. Lyon Company, 1912.
This regiment, Col. Edward Frisby, was accepted by the State May 22, 1861; organized at Troy, and there mustered in the service of the United States for two years June I, 1861; December 7, 1862, a new company joined the regiment, becoming Company F, in place of the one consolidated with the other companies. The three years’ men of the regiment were transferred to the 76th Infantry May 24, 1863.
The companies were recruited principally: A at Lansingburgh; B and I at Troy; C at Schenectady; D, F and G at Saratoga Springs; E at Poughkeepsie; H at Hoosick Falls and Eagle Bridge, and reorganized at Troy, and K at Kinderhook.
The regiment left the State June 28, 1861; served at and near Washington, D. C, from June 29, 1861, in Keyes’ Brigade, Division of Potomac, from August 4, 1861; in 1st, same, Brigade, McDowell’s Division, Army of the Potomac, from October, 1861; in 3d, Augur’s, Brigade, same division, from January, 1862; in 1st Brigade, 3d, King’s, Division, 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac, from March 13, 1862; in 1st Brigade, King’s Division, Department of Rappahannock, from May, 1862; in 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 3d Corps, Army of Virginia, from June 26, 1862; in same brigade and division, 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac, from September 12, 1862; and was honorably discharged and mustered out under Col. Wm. M. Searing, June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y.
June 23, 1863, Col. Morgan H. Chrysler received authority to reorganize this regiment for mounted and three years’ service as the Empire Light Cavalry; later, the designation was changed to 2d Veteran Cavalry, and under that name the reorganization was perfected.
During its service, the regiment lost by death, killed in action, 4 officers, 62 enlisted men; of wounds received in action, 2 officers, 13 enlisted men; of disease and other causes, 2 officers, 31 enlisted men; total, 8 officers, 106 enlisted men; aggregate, 114; of whom 3 enlisted men died in the hands of the enemy.

 

 

Thirtieth Infantry.-Cols., Edward Frisby, William M. Searing;  Lieut.-Cols., Charles E. Brintnall, William M. Searing, Morgan H.  Chrysler; Majs., William M. Searing, Morgan H. Chrysler, Albert  J.  Perry.  The 30th regiment, organized at Troy, was composed of two  companies recruited at Saratoga Springs, two at Troy, one each at  Lansingburg, Schenectady, Poughkeepsie, Hoosick, Valatie and in  Saratoga county, and was mustered into the U. S. service for two  years at Troy, June 1, 1861.  It left the state for Washington on  June 28; was stationed at Brightwood and Hunter’s Chapel;  established winter quarters at Upton’s hill until March 10, 1862,  left camp with the 1st brigade, 3d division, 1st corps, Army of  the Potomac (the Iron Brigade) and marched to Manassas; from  there to Falmouth, then to Massaponax and Front Royal.  Returning to Falmouth, reconnoitering expeditions were undertaken  to Orange Court House and Hanover Court House, where skirmishes  occurred.  With the 1st brigade.  1st division, 3d corps, Army of  Virginia, the regiment fought at White Sulphur Springs, at  Gainesville, at Groveton, and the second Bull Run, losing in the  last battle 66 members killed or mortally wounded out of 341  engaged-over 19 per cent.  The total loss of the command in this campaign was 183 killed,  wounded or missing, Col. Frisby being among the wounded.  After a  short time in camp at Upton’s hill, the regiment moved into  Maryland, was active at South mountain and at Antietam, after  which it went into camp at Sharpsburg, where its sadly depleted  ranks were reinforced by the addition of new recruits.  On Oct. 30, 1862, the regiment moved to Warrenton; thence to  Brooks’ station, near Falmouth, participated in the battle of  Fredericksburg; established winter quarters at Belle Plain, where  in Dec., 1862, a new company, which became Co. F, was added to  the regiment, the old Co. F, being consolidated with other  companies.  The regiment took part in the Chancellorsville campaign, then  returned for a short time to its camp at Belle Plain, which it  left on May 28, 1863, for Albany, and was there mustered out on  June 18.  The total enrollment of the regiment was 1,154 members  and it lost 78 by death from wounds during its term of service  and 33 died from other causes.  The three years men were  transferred to the 76th N. Y. infantry on May 24, 1863.

 

 

 

 

NAME: John Wright
RESIDENCE: Albany, New York
AGE AT ENLISTMENT: 18
ENLISTMENT DATE: 22 Sep 1862
RANK AT ENLISTMENT: Drummer
ENLISTMENT PLACE: Albany, New York
STATE SERVED: New York
SURVIVED THE WAR?: Yes
BIRTH DATE: 1844

 

NAME:

John Wright

AGE:

18

BIRTH YEAR:

1844

BIRTH PLACE:

Canada

ENLISTMENT YEAR:

1862

ENLISTMENT LOCATION:

Albany, New York

MUSTER YEAR:

1862

SEPARATION DETAILS:

Transferred

SEPARATION DATE:

25 May 1863

 

 SEVENTY-SIXTH NY INFANTRY

WRIGHT, JOHN.—Private , Co. F, Thirtieth Infantry; transferred to Co. G, this Regiment, May 25, 1863; wounded in action, July 1, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pa. ; transferred to Co. B, October 20, 1864; promoted corporal, October 30, 1864; transferred to Co. —, One Hundred and Forty-seventh Infantry, January 28, 1865.

 

 76th New York Volunteer Infantry

 

76th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment

Active September 2, 1861 to January 28, 1865
Country United States
Allegiance Union
Branch Infantry
Engagements Battle of Gainesville
Second Battle of Bull Run
Battle of South Mountain
Battle of Antietam
Battle of Fredericksburg
Battle of Chancellorsville
Battle of Gettysburg
Bristoe Campaign
Mine Run Campaign
Battle of the Wilderness
Battle of Spotsylvania Court House
Battle of Cold Harbor
Siege of Petersburg
Battle of Globe Tavern
Battle of Boydton Plank Road

The 76th New York Volunteer Infantry (“Cortland County Regiment”) was an infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Service

The 76th New York Infantry was organized at Cortland, and AlbanyNew York beginning September 2, 1861 and mustered in for three years service on January 16, 1862 under the command of Colonel Nelson W. Green. (The first company of the regiment was mustered in on October 4, 1861.)

The regiment was attached to 3rd Brigade, Casey’s Division, Army of the Potomac, to March 1862. Wadsworth’s Command, Military District of Washington, to May 1862. Doubleday’s Brigade, Department of the Rappahannock, to June 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, III CorpsArmy of Virginia, to September 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, I Corps, Army of the Potomac, to January 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, I Corps, to March 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, I Corps, to March 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, V Corps, to August 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, V Corps, to September 1864. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, V Corps, to January 1865.

Companies mustered out as follows: Companies B, F, and K on July 1, 1864; Company A on October 11, 1864; Company G on October 20, 1864; Company C on November 8, 1864; Company E on November 18, 1864; Company I on December 1, 1864; Company H on January 1, 1865; Company D, veterans, and recruits were transferred to 147th New York Infantry on January 28, 1865 and the 76th New York Infantry ceased to exist.

Detailed service

Left New York for Washington, D.C., January 17, 1862. Duty in the defenses of Washington D.C., until May 1862. Duty at and near Fredericksburg, Va., until August. Pope’s Campaign in northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Fords of the Rappahannock August 20–23. Battles of Gainesville August 2 Groveton August 29, Bull Run August 30. Maryland Campaign September 6–22. Battles of South Mountain September 14; Antietam September 16–17. At Sharpsburg, Md., until October 29. Advance to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12–15. “Mud March” January 20–24, 1863. At Falmouth and Belle Plains until April 27. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations at Pollock’s Mill Creek April 29-May 2. Battle of Chancellorsville May 2–5. Gettysburg Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, July 1–3. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5–24. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9–22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7–8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6–7, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River May 3-June 15. Battle of the Wilderness May 5–7; Laurel Hill May 8; Spotsylvania May 8–12; Spotsylvania Court House May 12–21. Assault on the Salient May 12. North Anna River May 23–26. Jericho Ford May 23. On line of the Pamunkey May 26–28. Totopotomoy May 28–31. Cold Harbor June 1–12. Bethesda Church June 1–3. Before Petersburg June 16–18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to January 28, 1865. Weldon Railroad August 18–21, 1864. Poplar Springs Church September 29-October 2. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher’s Run, October 27–28. Hicksford Raid December 7–11.

Casualties

The regiment lost a total of 330 men during service; 12 officers and 161 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded, 1 officer and 156 enlisted men died of disease.

Commanders

  • Colonel Nelson W. Green – called before a court of review in March 1862 by the officers of the regiment and ordered to be mustered out of the service by the War Department
  • Colonel William P. Wainwright
  • Colonel Charles E. Livingston
  • Lieutenant Colonel John E. Cook – commanded at the Battle of Gettysburg while still at the rank of captain following the death of Maj. Grover
  • Major Andrew J. Grover – commanded at the Battle of Gettysburg; killed early in action on July 1, 1863
  • Captain John W. Young – commanded at the Battle of Antietam

 

76th New York State Volunteers

“The Cortland Regiment”

The Seventy-Sixth Regiment, New York State Volunteers, was raised from the small towns and farms of central New York State. During its three years of existence it fought with the Army of the Potomac in most of the battles in the eastern theater of the war, from Fredericksburg to Petersburg. At the Battle of Gettysburg, the 76th was “first on the field”, at the right flank of the entire army, and suffered terrible casualties as a result. The men of the regiment were mustered out or transferred to other regiments between July 1864 and January 1865, at which point the regiment ceased to exist.

UNION NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS

76th Regiment, New York Infantry

OVERVIEW:

Organized at Courtland and Albany, N. Y., and mustered in January 16, 1862. Left State for Washington, D. C., January 17, 1862. Attached to 3rd Brigade, Casey’s Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Wadsworth’s Command, Military District of Washington, to May, 1862. Doubleday’s Brigade, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to June, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Corps, Pope’s Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 5th Army Corps, to August, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, to September, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 5th Army Corps, to January, 1865.

SERVICE:

Duty in the Defences or Washington, D. C., till May, 1862. Duty at and near Fredericksburg, Va, till August. Pope’s Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Fords of the Rappahannock August 20-23. Battles of Gainesville August 28; Groveton August 29, Bull Run August 30. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battles of South Mountain September 14; Antietam September 16-17. At Sharpsburg, Md., till October 29. Advance to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. “Mud March” January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth and Belle Plains till April 27. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations at Pollock’s Mill Creek April 29-May 2. Battle of Chancellorsville May 2-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Duty on line of the Rappahannock till October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Laurel Hill May 8; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. Jericho Ford May 23. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Bethesda Church June 1-3. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to January 28, 1865. Weldon Railroad August 18-21, 1864. Poplar Springs Church September 29-October 2. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher’s Run, October 27-28. Hicksford Raid December 7-11. Companies mustered out as follows: Companies “B,” “F” and “K” July 1, 1864; Company “A” October 11; Company “G” October 20; Company “C” November 8; Company “E” November 18; Company “I” December 1, 1864; Company “H” January 1, 1865; Company “D” and Veterans and Recruits transferred to 147th Regiment, New York Infantry, January 28, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 12 Officers and 161 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 156 Enlisted men by disease. Total 330.

 76th Infantry Regiment

Civil War
Cortland Regiment; Cherry Valley Regiment; Otsego County Regiment; Cromwellian Regiment

History

Mustered in: January 16, 1862
Mustered out by companies: July 1, 1864 to January 1,1865.

The following is taken from New York in the War of the Rebellion, 3rd ed. Frederick Phisterer. Albany: J. B. Lyon Company, 1912.
Colonel Nelson W. Green of Cortland received authority to recruit a regiment of infantry in Cortland county, and commenced recruiting September 2, 1861, receiving some men from the counties of Allegany and Yates. About the same time Gen. George E. Danforth received authority to recruit a regiment in the counties of Otsego and Schoharie, with headquarters at Cherry Valley, to which regiment the 39th Militia furnished a large number of men. These regiments were moved to Albany, and being below the minimum number, consolidated into one, the 76th Regiment, with N. W. Green as Colonel, January 14, 1862. Companies A, B, C, D, E, F and G were formed of eight companies of the Cortland Regiment, and H, I and K of four companies of the Cherry Valley Regiment. One company, I, of the Cortland Regiment, and the companies of Capts. Nicholas Hanson and Nelson S. Bowdish, of the Cherry Valley Regiment, were organized as a battery and assigned as Battery M to the 3d Artillery; Captain McNett’s company of the Cortland Regiment was transferred to the 93d Infantry, December 28, 1861. The newly formed regiment contained also men from the counties, of Chenango, Madison, Tioga and Tompkins, and was mustered in the service of the United States for three years January 16, 1862. In May, 1863, it received the three years’ men of the 24th and 30th Regiments of Infantry.
The regiment left the State January 17, 1862; served at and near Washington, D. C., in 3d Brigade, Casey’s Division, Army of the Potomac, from January, 1862; in the Military district of Washington from March, 1862; in Doubleday’s Brigade, Department Rappahannock, from May 21, 1862; in the 2d Brigade, 1st Division, 3d Corps, Army of Virginia, from June 26, 1862; in the 2d Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac, from September 12, 1862; in the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac, from January 4, 1864; in the 2d Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac, from March 6, 1864; in the 2d Brigade, 4th Division, 5th Corps, Army of the Potomac, from March 25, 1864; in the 3d Brigade, 2d Division, 5th Corps, from August, 1864; in the 3d Brigade, 3d Division, 5th Corps, Army of the Potomac, from September 1864. Companies B, F and K were honorably discharged and mustered out July 1, 1864; Company A October 11; G October 20; C November 8; E November 18; I December 1, 1864; H January 1, 1865; detachments of these companies and Company D remaining in the field were, under Capt. Albert J. Jarvis, transferred to the 147th N. Y. Volunteers January 28 and 31, 1865.
During its service the regiment lost by death, killed in action, 7 officers, 111 enlisted men; of wounds received in action, 5 officers, 52 enlisted men; of disease and other causes, 1 officer, 165 enlisted men; total, 13 officers, 328 enlisted men; aggregate, 341; of whom 56 enlisted men died in the hands of the enemy.

The following is taken from The Union army: a history of military affairs in the loyal states, 1861-65 — records of the regiments in the Union army — cyclopedia of battles — memoirs of commanders and soldiers. Madison, WI: Federal Pub. Co., 1908. volume II.
Seventy-sixth Infantry.—Cols., Nelson W. Green, W. P. Wain-wright, Charles E. Livingston; Lieut.-Cols., John D. Shaul, Charles E. Livingston, Andrew J. Grover, John E. Cook, Charles A. Wat-kins; Majs., Charles E. Livingston, Andrew J. Grover, John E. Cook, John W. Young. The 76th, the “Cortland Regiment,” recruited principally in Cortland and Otsego counties, was mustered into the U. S. service at Albany, Jan. 16, 1862, for three years. It left the state the next day for Washington, was assigned to the 3d brigade of Casey’s division and served in the vicinity of Washington during the first winter. It suffered its first severe loss at Manassas in Aug., 1862, when it served with the 2nd brigade, 1st division, 3d corps, losing in the several engagements of Gen. Pope’s campaign, 147 in killed, wounded and missing. It was active at South mountain and Antietam, its brigade and division having been assigned to the 1st corps, with which it accompanied the cavalry advance through Philomont, Union and Upperville, Va. It participated in the battle of Fredericksburg, went into winter quarters near Fal-mouth and during the Chancellorsville movement, lost 3 men while guarding bridges. At Gettysburg the regiment took a prominent part and suffered the loss of 234 in killed, wounded and missing. Previous to this battle the ranks had been reinforced by the addition of the veterans and recruits of the 24th and 30th N. Y. infan-try, but after Gettysburg they were again sadly thinned. The regiment participated in the Mine Run fiasco, and at Brandy Station in Jan., 1864, was transferred to the 1st brigade of the same division, returning to its old brigade in March, and was later assigned to the 2nd brigade, 4th division, 5th corps, and broke camp in April for the Wilderness campaign, in which it suffered its greatest loss during the first two days—282 killed, wounded or missing. It continued to see hard service at Spottsylvania, the North Anna, Toto-potomoy, Cold Harbor and Petersburg, where it took part in the siege operations until the end of its term of service. It was mustered out by companies, July I, Oct. II and 20, Nov. 8 and 18, Dec. 1, 1864, and Jan. 1, 1865, the veterans and recruits being transferred to the 147th N. Y. infantry. The regiment lost during its term of service 175 by death from wounds and 166 by death from accident, imprisonment or disease, of whom 56 died in imprisonment. It ranks among the “three hundred fighting regiments.”

On the 1st day of July the 76th Regiment had the dear bought honor to be the advance regiment of the 1st Corps, and nobly did they preserve the honor thus confered upon them. After coming in sight of the town of Gettysburg, our column filed to the left of the town and was forming in line of battle upon an eminence beyond the Seminary. Before our troops were placed in position, the enemy opened upon us a destructive fire with Artillery and Infantry. The 76th being the advance of the Corps, of course were on the extreme right, and subject to the cross fire from the enemy, who had succeeded in flanking us. Our gallant boys now returned their fire with interest as the enemy arose from their cover in a wheat field and charged upon us, supposing we were raw militia, they advanced their line steadily firing as they came. Our officers and men were falling upon every side and it was evident that they meant to surround us by their superior numbers, (the eleventh Corps had not yet arrived,) as we were now completely flanked. At this junction the gallant Major Grover fell mortally wounded, and died in a few moments after. The command now devolved upon Capt. John E. Cook, a brave and efficient officer who by his gallantry has won imperishable laurels. Too much cannot be said in praise of all, both officers and men, and many brave deeds were done which will never see the pages of history. At this time orders came from Gen. Cutler for us to fall back to the cover of a piece of woods. Our line was now re-formed and out of 340 men and 25 officers who entered the engagement only 100 men and 7 officers remained, showing how very destructive was the fire to which we were subjected, as we could not have been exposed more than twenty minutes. We again advanced and occupied our old ground with our skirmishers, but what a sight met our view.—Between our line of skirmishers and our line of battle lay our brave and heroic comrads, many gone to that land from whence no traveller returns, some in the agonies of death, and many of the wounded who were able to raise upon an elbow, cheering us on with: “give it to them boys, never mind us.”
After holding our ground for sometime, we were marched in an oblique direction to the right, and took a position upon an eminence where the enemy were again trying their favorite flanking movement with a large force. There is no doubt but that the gallant and heroic 1st corps were now holding in check Lee’s entire army. We were here engaged in a very heavy musketry fire, and exposed to a terrible shelling. After expending our sixty rounds of ammunition which told with terrible effect upon the enemy and completely silenced their Infantry fire, we were relieved by fresh troops. From this position we were forced beyond the city to the heights around Cemetry Hill, where the noble army of the Potomac upon the soil of Pennsylvania fully demonstrated to the world the kind of material of which it is composed.
Time and space will not permit me to give any details of the remaining three days fighting, which completely vanquished the invaders.
Yours Respectfully, C. A. WATKINS.
1st Lieut. and Acting Adj’t.