CS Richmond Low Hump 1863 Rifled Musket with the Name and Belt Keeper of a Union POW in the Stock

$10,500

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CS Richmond Low Hump 1863 Rifled Musket with the Name and Belt Keeper of a Union POW in the Stock – At the onset of the Civil War, the Confederates were able to briefly capture and hold the Federal Arsenal at Harpers Ferry. They removed the gun-making machinery and transported it to the Richmond Armory and began production of the so-called “CS Richmond” carbines and 3-band long rifles. The purloined machinery was designed to manufacture lock plates for the M1855 US, Maynard tape primer rifles; these lock plates were intended to be milled out to accept the Maynard tape ignition system, hence the raised profile of these lock plates. Although the Confederate gun makers at the Richmond Armory utilized the captured machinery, they did not mill out the lock plates for the Maynard priming system, but chose to leave the raised area of the plates, hence the presence of the “hump” in CS Richmonds.

This Richmond rifled musket remains in overall excellent, working condition; the lock plate is clearly stamped as follows – forward of the hammer:

C.S.

RICHMOND, VA

behind the hammer:

1863

The barrel, just past the breech plug, exhibits the Federal, Harper’s Ferry stamping – “VP” over an eagle. The three barrel bands are each stamped with the usual “U”; two of the barrel bands’ letters are clearly offset from the band springs. The nose cap and butt plate are both constructed of brass; use by the Richmond Armory of captured, Harpers Ferry parts is evidenced by the brass butt plate which is stamped: “US” on the tang of the plate. The ramrod is original to the gun; it is the typical swell-tip type and retains the threaded area on the opposite end. The correct rear sight is in place and has two elevation sighting leaves. We removed the lock plate to reveal the inner lock plate mortise – the so-called “mule shoe” is present, indicative of the gun never having been made for use with the Maynard priming system.

Of great significance are the two sets of carvings on the side of the stock opposite to the lock plate. Plainly visible are three, deeply carved initials – “RRS”. When we obtained this rifle, we noticed that there were additional, shallowly carved letters, just after the deeply carved initials. Unable to decipher these additional letters, we took the rifle to our art conservator friends who utilized IR and UV photographic analysis photography. Their resultant images revealed a second, complete name, lightly scratched behind the boldly carved three initials:

L MATTOZ

We were able to determine that L. Mattoz was indeed a private in Co. F of the 57th Illinois Infantry; he was apparently captured and incarcerated at the infamous, Confederate prison camp of Andersonville. Mattoz actually survived and was exchanged on April 1, 1865. There is only scant information available on Private Mattoz, so we could not find out where he was captured and only a most cursory record of his service. We presume that Mattoz, at some point either during the war or just after his release from captivity, obtained this Richmond rifle, as a wartime souvenir or memento; we also presume Private Mattoz was responsible for tacking his issue, US, brass, belt keeper to the left side of the cheek of the butt stock.

The rifle remains in overall excellent condition; it has a bright finish, with some minor, shallow, now smooth, pitted areas. All stampings are clear; the firing mechanism is strong; the bore remains clean with significant rifling remaining. This is a fine example of a low-hump, 1863 Richmond, with an added, unusual, Union soldier ID.

Measurements: Overall length – 56”; Barrel length – 40”

Illinois Survivors of Andersonville Prison

                          Co. Reg.service

MATTOZ, L PVT L 57 UNK . EXCHANGED APRIL 1 1865

 

SURNAME: L Mattoz
RANK: PVT
COMPANY: F
REGIMENT: 57
STATE: IL
REMARKS: EXCHANGED APRIL 1, 1865

L Mattoz

in the Web: US, Andersonville and Fort McHenry Civil War Prisoner Index, 1861-1865

NAME: L Mattoz
PRISON: Andersonville
SIDE: Union
RANK: Private
STATE WHERE ENLISTED: Illinois
UNIT: 57 Illinois
REGIMENT: 57
COMPANY: F
DESCRIPTION: Held at Andersonville and survived
REMARKS: EXCHANGED APRIL 1, 1865

Mattoz, L

SIDE:

Union

UNIT NAME:

57 Illinois

REGIMENT:

57

STATE:

Illinois

FUNCTION:

COMPANY:

F

RANK:

Private

DESCRIPTION:

Held at Andersonville and survived

CAPTURE DATE:

CAPTURE SITE:

ALTERNATE NAME:

REMARKS:

57th Illinois Infantry Regiment

57th Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry “National Guards”
Active December 26, 1861, to July 7, 1865
Country United States
Allegiance Union
Branch Infantry
Engagements Battle of Shiloh
Battle of Resaca
Battle of Kennesaw Mountain
Siege of Atlanta
March to the Sea
Battle of Bentonville

The 57th Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Service

The 57th Illinois Infantry was organized at Shawneetown, Illinois, and mustered into Federal service on December 26, 1861, to serve for three years. At the expiration of the enlistment period, the original members was mustered out, except reenlisted veterans. The regiment composed of veterans and recruits were maintained in service until it was mustered out on July 7, 1865.[1]

Total strength and casualties

1862- Investment and capture of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 14–16, 1862. Moved to Fort Henry, Tenn., February 17; thence to Crump’s Landing, Tenn., March 8–13, and to Pittsburg Landing March 28. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6–7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 6. Duty at Corinth, Miss., until November, 1863. Battle of Corinth October 3–4, 1862. Pursuit of enemy to Hatchie River October 5–12. At Corinth until April, 1863. Grant’s Central Mississippi Campaign November, 1862, to January, 1863.

1863 – Operations against Forest in West Tennessee December 18, 1862, to January 3, 1863. Dodge’s Expedition to Northern Alabama April 15-May 2, 1863. Great Bear Creek, Cherokee Station and Lundy’s Lane April 17. Rock Cut, near Tuscumbia, April 22. Tuscumbia April 23. Town Creek April 28. At Corinth until November. Grand Junction, Tenn., July 30, 1863.

1864 – Moved to Eastport, Pulaski and Lynnville November 6–12, and duty there until March, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May to September, 1864. Demonstrations on Resaca May 8–13. Sugar Valley, near Resaca, May 9. Near Resaca May 13. Battle of Resaca May 14–15. Ley’s Ferry, Oostenaula River, May 14–15. Rome Cross Roads May 16. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff’s Mills July 3–4. Chattahoochie River July 5–17. Decatur and battle of Atlanta July 22. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Scout from Rome to Cedar Bluffs, Ala., July 28–29 (Detachment). Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25–30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. LoveJoy Station September 2–6. Moved to Rome September 26, and duty there until November 11. Battle of Allatoona October 5 (Cos. “A,” “B”). Reconnaissance on Cave Springs Road and skirmishes October 12–13. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Ogeechee River and Canal December 9. Siege of Savannah December 10–21.

1865 – Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Salkehatchie Swamp, S.C., February 2–5. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 11–12. Congaree Creek February 15. Columbia February 16–17. Battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 20–21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10–14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett’s House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 19. Grand Review May 24. Moved to Louisville, Ky., June 3. Mustered out July 7, 1865. The regiment suffered 3 officers and 65 enlisted men who were killed in action or mortally wounded and 4 officers and 108 enlisted men who died of disease, for a total of 180 fatalities.[2]

Commanders and others

57th Regiment, Illinois Infantry

OVERVIEW:

Organized at Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill., and mustered in December 26, 1861. Moved to Cairo, Ill.; thence to Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 8-14, 1862. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, District of Cairo, February, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, District of West Tennessee and Army of the Tennessee, to July, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, District of Corinth, to November, 1862. 3rd Brigade, District of Corinth, 18th Army Corps (Old), Department of the Tennessee, to December, 1862. 3rd Brigade, District of Corinth, 17th Army Corps, to January, 1863. 3rd Brigade, District of Corinth, 16th Army Corps, to March, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 16th Army Corps, to September, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 4th Division, 15th Army Corps, to July, 1865.

SERVICE:

Investment and capture of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 14-16, 1862. Moved to Fort Henry, Tenn., February 17; thence to Crump’s Landing, Tenn., March 8-13, and to Pittsburg Landing March 28. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 6. Duty at Corinth, Miss., till November, 1863. Battle of Corinth October 3-4, 1862. Pursuit of enemy to Hatchie River October 5-12. At Corinth till April, 1863. Grant’s Central Mississippi Campaign November, 1862, to January, 1863. Operations against Forest in West Tennessee December 18, 1862, to January 3, 1863. Dodge’s Expedition to Northern Alabama April 15-May 2, 1863. Great Bear Creek, Cherokee Station and Lundy’s Lane April 17. Rock Cut, near Tuscumbia, April 22. Tuscumbia April 23. Town Creek April 28. At Corinth till November. Grand Junction, Tenn., July 30, 1863. Moved to Eastport, Pulaski and Lynnville November 6-12, and duty there till March, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May to September, 1864. Demonstrations on Resaca May 8-13. Sugar Valley, near Resaca, May 9. Near Resaca May 13. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Ley’s Ferry, Oostenaula River, May 14-15. Rome Cross Roads May 16. Kingston May 19. Assigned garrison duty at Rome, Ga. May 22 until November 10. Scout from Rome to Cedar Bluffs, Ala., July 28-29, (Detachment). Expedition after Wheeler August 15 – September 15. Battle of Allatoona October 5 (Cos. “A,” “B”). Reconnoissance on Cave Springs Road and skirmishes October 12-13. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Ogeechee River and Canal December 9. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Salkehatchie Swamps, S. C., February 2-5. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 11-12. Congaree Creek February 15. Columbia February 16-17. Battle of Bentonville, N.C., March 20-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett’s House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D. C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 19. Grand Review May 24. Moved to Louisville, Ky., June 3. Mustered out July 7, 1865.